Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A murderer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A murderer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then he looked at the twain and saw them dig a grave and therein bury the slain bird; after which they flew away far into the firmament and disappeared for a while; but presently they returned with the murtherer-bird and, alighting on the grave of the murthered, stamped on the slayer till they had done him to death.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • This is a lad of fifteen and he hath not slain a sparrow; so how should he be a murtherer?

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Therewithal the King was assured that this was indeed he who slew his son; so presently he called his Wazirs and said to them, This is the murtherer of my son sans shadow of doubt: so how do you counsel me to deal with him?

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Not then enuironed with walles, ne pente vp with rampers, and diches of deapthe, but walking at free scope emong the wanderyng beastes of the fielde, and where the night came vpon theim, there takyng their lodgyng without feare of murtherer or thief.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Alas, my death would be but your dishonour; I cannot be termed mine owne murtherer, when the Dart came from your eye that did it, and must remaine a witnes of your rigor.

    The Decameron

  • I neither can nor will longer endure this base Villanie of thine: to the mercy of heaven I commit my soul, and stand there my wheele, a witnesse against so hard-hearted a murtherer.

    The Decameron

  • Wilt thou turne Monster, and be a murtherer of her that never wronged thee, to please another man, and on a bare command?

    The Decameron

  • And before any person could take notice thereof, hee became (of a theefe) Ruffian, forswearer, and murtherer, as formerly he had-beene a great Preacher; yet not abandoning the forenamed vices, when secretly he could put any of them in execution.

    The Decameron

  • So either thou must flie upon the supposed offence, or lose all thy goodes by banishment, or (which is much more fitting for thee) have thy head smitten off, as a wilfull murtherer of thy wife; for all will Judge it to be no otherwise.

    The Decameron

  • Lastly, converting his thoughts to Aldobrandino, the imagined murtherer of a man yet living, infinite cares beleagured his soule, in devising what might best be done for his deliverance.

    The Decameron

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