Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The muscular layer in the wall of a hollow organ or tube, such as the stomach or blood-vessels.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is characterized by crypt abscesses and ulcerations extending down to the muscularis and surrounded by prominent mucosal infiltrate of inflammatory cells.

    IBD resources for professionals

  • Occasionally the current should be rapidly reversed by means of the commutator, the intensity however having been previously reduced, in order to avoid too severe a shock; this will cause efficient contractions of the abdominal _parietes_, and probably also of the intestinal _muscularis_.

    The Electric Bath

  • Atony of the _muscularis_ of the intestine is admittedly the direct cause, in most instances, of constipation.

    The Electric Bath

  • My diagnosis was _paresis of the muscularis of the intestine_.

    The Electric Bath

  • The muscular coat (tunica muscularis) forms the chief bulk of the substance of the uterus.

    XI. Splanchnology. 3d. 3. The Uterus

  • The external and middle layers constitute the muscular coat proper, while the inner layer is a greatly hypertrophied muscularis mucosæ.

    XI. Splanchnology. 3d. 3. The Uterus

  • It consists of the following structures: next the areolar or submucous coat is a double layer of unstriped muscular fibers, outer longitudinal and inner circular, the muscularis mucosæ internal to this is a quantity of retiform tissue, enclosing in its meshes lymph corpuscles, and in this the bloodvessels and nerves ramify; lastly, a basement membrane, supporting a single layer of epithelial cells, which throughout the intestine are columnar in character.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2g. The Small Intestine

  • The muscular coat (tunica muscularis) consists of two layers of unstriped fibers: an external, longitudinal, and an internal, circular layer.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2g. The Small Intestine

  • This plexus lies in the submucous coat of the intestine; it also contains ganglia from which nerve fibers pass to the muscularis mucosæ and to the mucous membrane.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2g. The Small Intestine

  • The muscular fibers are derived from the muscularis mucosæ, and are arranged in longitudinal bundless around the lacteal vessel, extending from the base to the summit of the villus, and giving off, laterally, individual muscle cells, which are enclosed by the reticulum, and by it are attached to the basement-membrane and to the lacteal.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2g. The Small Intestine

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