Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having a feeling of nausea.
  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of nauseate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • DRob, I think you meant that it made you nauseated, that is unless you meant that it caused you to make the people around you feel sick.

    9-year-old child Given Marijuana for Medical Reasons

  • DRob, I think you meant that it made you nauseated, that is unless you meant that it caused you to make the people around you feel sick.

    9-year-old child Given Marijuana for Medical Reasons » E-Mail

  • It's actually a pet peeve, right up there with saying "momentarily" when one means "in a moment" or "nauseous" when one means "nauseated" -- except, of course, that it's far far worse because people who think pity is the same thing as compassion have no incentive to work on developing genuine compassion.

    The pity "conundrum," part one

  • “The word is nauseated, not nauseous,” he explained.

    Closing Time

  • If small amounts of food are taken five or six times a day, a tendency to be nauseated, which is not uncommon in the early months of pregnancy, can often be averted.

    The Prospective Mother, a Handbook for Women During Pregnancy

  • Casey tries to be liberal but is kind of nauseated by what she sees -- and even more so, what she hears, because Hugh had used the same exact phrase to her during sex that one of the men did in the porn video.

    July 2007

  • The chewing tobacco cake actually made me nauseated, meaning physically ill.

    Proper Grooming

  • Casey tries to be liberal but is kind of nauseated by what she sees -- and even more so, what she hears, because Hugh had used the same exact phrase to her during sex that one of the men did in the porn video.

    Thursday Night at Bluestockings: Min Jin Lee and Rebecca Wolff for WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly

  • Nobody in our family ever even uses the word 'nauseous,' preferring the less trendy, easier to spell, and less usagely debatable 'nauseated'.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • Nobody in our family ever even uses the word 'nauseous,' preferring the less trendy, easier to spell, and less usagely debatable 'nauseated'.

    kids say the darndest things

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.