Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun an advocate of neoclassicism.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a follower of neoclassicism

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an advocate of neoclassicism
  • adjective relating to or advocating neoclassicism

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At this crucial moment, Picasso groped backward, imitating the Farnese Hercules statue he had seen on a trip to Naples, or the torqued nudes created by the 19th century neoclassicist Ingres.

    Blockbuster Picasso show in Richmond must be seen, but it's not all masterpieces

  • The freshwater market's viewpoint rests strongly on the efficient markets hypothesis, or EMH, as propounded by the University of Chicago's Eugene Fama in the 1970s and later bolstered by Chicago's best-known neoclassicist, Milton Friedman.

    The Future Of Economic Forecasting

  • Despite Burns's insistence that he hasn't bought into any particular view of jazz history, his film leans strongly to the neoclassicist analyses of Murray, Crouch and Marsalis -- "the evil triumvirate," Burns says, wryly acknowledging the hostility they evoke from less conservative critics and musicians.

    The Story Of Jazz

  • A neoclassicist may seek to explain this trend by a change in constraints, such as rising costs, new taxes, increase in the drinking age, and so on.

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • A neoclassicist suggested that the issue here is just semantic: neoclassicists say people enjoy the consumptions of their grandchildren, deontologists suggest that the same behavior reflects a moral commitment.

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • A neoclassicist suggested that the issue here is just semantic: neoclassicists say people enjoy the consumptions of their grandchildren, deontologists suggest that the same behavior reflects a moral commitment.

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • When this idea was the subject of a panel during the 1984 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, a neoclassicist argued against the national service on the grounds that “we can get all the people we need by paying them.”

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • A neoclassicist may seek to explain this trend by a change in constraints, such as rising costs, new taxes, increase in the drinking age, and so on.

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • When this idea was the subject of a panel during the 1984 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, a neoclassicist argued against the national service on the grounds that “we can get all the people we need by paying them.”

    THE MORAL DIMENSION

  • But it is hardly true that Purney's "true kinship is with the romantics," as Mr. White claims, for there is a wide chasm between a romantic and a daring and extravagant neoclassicist.

    A Full Enquiry into the Nature of the Pastoral (1717)

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