Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An emerging field of interdisciplinary study that explores the effects of discoveries in neuroscience on legal rules and standards.

Etymologies

neuro- +‎ law (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Our three main prongs involve time perception, synesthesia, and neurolaw.

    The Bullet-Time Matrix | I Rate Science Fiction Doctors

  • Paired with a growing interest in the field of neurolaw, which examines the intersection of neuroscience and legal systems, the desire for tools that can objectively assess the accuracy of memories is palpable.

    Seed - Bad Memory (Eye Witness Reports)

  • Helping judges and juries improve such evaluations is an important part of the Stanford neurolaw project, says Greely.

    Seed - Bad Memory (Eye Witness Reports)

  • As neurolaw grows in influence, it could potentially revolutionize our notions of guilt and punishment as criminals say 'my brain made me do it.'

    Archive 2008-01-01

  • Aggression, Violence and the Brain showing a cat and a bull with implants, then neuroethics and neurolaw in a case study.

    Brain Vod Modules

  • There is a flourishing academic discipline of “neurolaw” and neurolawyers are penetrating the legal system.

    Speedlinking 10/26/07

  • Proponents of neurolaw say that neuroscientific evidence will have a large impact not only on questions of guilt and punishment but also on the detection of lies and hidden bias, and on the prediction of future criminal behavior.

    Prefrontal Nudity « Gerry Canavan

  • So we now for instance have neuroeconomics, neuromarketing, neuroarchitecture, neuroarcheology, neurolaw, neuropolitics, neuroesthetics see Chapters 4 and 8, and even neurotheology.

    NPR Topics: News

  • The research concentrates on time perception, synesthesia, and neurolaw.

    Slate Magazine

  • Science explores the rise of neurolaw What if a jury could decide a man's guilt through mind reading?

    WN.com - Articles related to Science shows that women need more sleep

Comments

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  • New York Times Magazine: 'Proponents of neurolaw say that neuroscientific evidence will have a large impact not only on questions of guilt and punishment but also on the detection of lies and hidden bias, and on the prediction of future criminal behavior. At the same time, skeptics fear that the use of brain-scanning technology as a kind of super mind-reading device will threaten our privacy and mental freedom, leading some to call for the legal system to respond with a new concept of “cognitive liberty.�?'

    October 8, 2008