Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative form of news hole.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Except for general community/local, less than 2% of newshole is the typical allotment for each of those subjects.

    New News: Deconstructing the newspaper « BuzzMachine

  • According to the same piece, "While in all of 2007 the Iraq war occupied an average 15.5 percent of the" newshole "in the media, in the last quarter it fell to nine percent, and then to just 3.9 percent in the first quarter of 2008 ..."

    Adam Blickstein: Miracle Mildew More Important than Implosion of Iraq?

  • I know this is slightly off-topic, as you folks were having a lively debate about the Pew study findings about the "newshole" that's what she said versus "punditry" -- the USAT findings are all the more interesting in that light.

    Re: The U.S. Attorney Story: By the Numbers - Swampland - TIME.com

  • The debate over the proposed Islamic center and mosque in lower Manhattan dominated the media's attention last week -- with cable news channels devoting far more of their "newshole" than newspapers.

    STLtoday.com Top News Headlines

  • Of the remainder, religious news only accounted for 1 percent of the "newshole," which is the time or space available for content in a news outlet.

    Catholic Online > Daily Readings

  • The percentages are based on "newshole," or the space devoted to each subject in print and online and time on radio and TV.

    Media Channel 2.0

  • The percentages are based on "newshole," or the space devoted to each subject in print and online and time on radio and TV.

    Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ) - Understanding News in the Information Age

  • At my request, the wonderful people at PEJ provided their raw data on how much coverage Iraq and Afghanistan were getting as a percentage of the "newshole" over the last year.

    FP Passport

  • The percentages are based on "newshole," or the space devoted to each subject in print and online and time on radio and TV.

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  • The percentages are based on "newshole," or the space devoted to each subject in print and online and time on radio and TV.

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Comments

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  • According to John Scalzi, "the amount of space allotted to a print writer to do a review, usually based on how many ads the newspaper or magazine has sold for that day." From the Ficlets Blog.

    June 13, 2007