Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun theology The essential nature or ‘substance’ of god.
  • noun philosophy Essence, being.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek οὐσία, feminine present participle of εἰμί ("I am").

Examples

  • For example, that which we term ousia is by some called esia, and by others again osia.

    The CRATYLUS

  • In the same manner, in the matter in question, the term ousia is common, like goodness, or Godhead, or any similar attribute; while hypostasis is contemplated in the special property of Fatherhood, Sonship, or the power to sanctify.

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • For example, that which we term ousia is by some called esia, and by others again osia.

    Cratylus

  • They had been driven to condemn in succession the accurate homoousion and the harmless homoiousion, and even the word ousia, or substance.

    NPNF2-09. Hilary of Poitiers, John of Damascus

  • The non-identity of hypostasis and ousia is, I take it, suggested even by our western brethren, where, from a suspicion of the inadequacy of their own language, they have given the word ousia in the Greek, to the end that any possible difference of meaning might be preserved in the clear and unconfounded distinction of terms.

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • Heracleitus; -- the doctrine of the flux is contained in the word ousia (= osia the pushing principle), an anticipation of Anaxagoras is found in psuche and selene.

    Cratylus

  • However, not only is homos ambiguous; the word ousia itself was often taken as equivalent to hypostasis (person), as apparently is the case in the anathema attached to the Nicene Symbol.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Jesus Christ, generated from Him before the ages, "recommended the disuse of the terms ousia (essence or substance), homoousion

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • Indeed, if the Greek term being translated as 'being' in GNB were ousia, which is sometimes translated as 'being', then the homoousios can be taken as logically entailing that God is being.

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • Indeed, if the Greek term being translated as 'being' in GNB were ousia, which is sometimes translated as 'being', then the homoousios can be taken as logically entailing that God is being.

    Not talking about God

Comments

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  • The feminine of ontia; the 'being' of somebody with specific reference to his stuff.

    August 21, 2008