Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The tongue of an ox.
  • noun One of several plants with rough tongue-shaped leaves, especially Picris (Helminthia) echioides, and the alkanet, Anchusa officinalis. Compare bugloss.
  • noun A name sometimes given to the anlace, braquemart, and similar short broadswords.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A widespread European weed (Picris echioides formerly Helminthia echioides) with spiny tongue-shaped leaves and yellow flowers. The name is applied to several plants, from the shape and roughness of their leaves; as, Anchusa officinalis, a kind of bugloss, and Helminthia echioides, both European herbs. It has been naturalized in the U. S.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Beef tongue (a foodstuff).
  • noun A flowering plant of the genus Picris, especially Picris echioides, the bristly oxtongue.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun widespread European weed with spiny tongue-shaped leaves and yellow flowers; naturalized in United States

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “He wears, he wore a long surcoat with a pomegranate design, and a wreath of juniper and greenthorn and oxtongue.”

    Wildfire

  • They should have given him a garland of the speckled leaves and stems of oxtongue, for falsehood.

    Wildfire

  • “He wears, he wore a long surcoat with a pomegranate design, and a wreath of juniper and greenthorn and oxtongue.”

    Wildfire

  • They should have given him a garland of the speckled leaves and stems of oxtongue, for falsehood.

    Wildfire

  • “He wears, he wore a long surcoat with a pomegranate design, and a wreath of juniper and greenthorn and oxtongue.”

    Wildfire

  • They should have given him a garland of the speckled leaves and stems of oxtongue, for falsehood.

    Wildfire

  • To bezoar stone most subscribe, Manardus, and [4328] many others; it takes away sadness, and makes him merry that useth it; I have seen some that have been much diseased with faintness, swooning, and melancholy, that taking the weight of three grains of this stone, in the water of oxtongue, have been cured.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • The dogwood leaves are bright carmine, and the maple yellow as sulphur, the last flowers are out in the hedges, the pink cranesbill and the blue oxtongue which will hang on till after

    The Village Pulpit, Volume II. Trinity to Advent A Complete Course of 66 Short Sermons, or Full Sermon Outlines for Each Sunday, and Some Chief Holy Days of the Christian Year

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.