Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An Anglican cleric with full legal control of a parish under ecclesiastical law; a rector.
  • noun A member of the clergy, especially a Protestant minister.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A person.
  • noun The person in holy orders who has the charge or cure of souls in a parish; the incumbent of a parochial benefice.
  • noun A clergyman in general; a man licensed to preach: often used colloquially, or with a touch of contempt: as, a fox-hunting parson.
  • noun A tiny finch of Brazil, Spermophila minuta.
  • noun The parson-bird or poe-bird.
  • noun Synonyms Clergyman, Priest, etc. See minister, n.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Eng. Eccl. Law) A person who represents a parish in its ecclesiastical and corporate capacities; hence, the rector or incumbent of a parochial church, who has full possession of all the rights thereof, with the cure of souls.
  • noun Any clergyman having ecclesiastical preferment; one who is in orders, or is licensed to preach; a preacher.
  • noun (Zoöl.) a New Zealand bird (Prosthemadera Novæseelandiæ) remarkable for its powers of mimicry and its ability to articulate words. Its color is glossy black, with a curious tuft of long, curly, white feathers on each side of the throat. It is often kept as a cage bird.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An Anglican cleric having full legal control of a parish under ecclesiastical law; a rector.
  • noun A Protestant minister.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a person authorized to conduct religious worship

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, parish priest, from Old French persone, from Medieval Latin persōna, from Latin, character; see person.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman, from Old French persone ("parson, person"), from Medieval Latin persona ("parson, person"), from Latin persona ("person").

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