Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of patrol.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A new study of wild chimpanzees shows that the biggest predictor of territorial boundary patrols is the number of males in the group.

    Sunday, Sanguine Sunday

  • The job of the handlers, who are highly skilled at avoiding Israeli army checkpoints or police patrols, is to deliver the bomber as close to the target as possible.

    The Logic of Suicide Terrorism

  • On that date, thirty-eight years ago, my platoon of Marines was conducting patrols from a hill in the middle of "Dodge City," a hostile area about 15 miles southwest of Da Nang, South Vietnam.

    Rykoskey, Edward J.

  • He took part in patrols, search and destroy missions, guard duty, and fought in the Tet Offensive in March 1968.

    Baird, William A.

  • As dusk falls, army personnel with rifles slung over their shoulders begin short patrols on the highway.

    Hindustan Times News Feeds 'Views'

  • Because when it comes to occupation, it comes down to individual soldiers on the ground with small arms, in patrols.

    ZUMBOMANIA, PART II: David E.

  • Well, it essentially means that the troops and the observers will stay in their respective bases, not go out on patrols, which is routinely what they do on a daily basis.

    CNN Transcript Mar 8, 2003

  • The Scoutmaster's whistle called the patrols to attention.

    Don Strong, Patrol Leader

  • He ate, drank and slept among colored people after he was a grown man, and in many cases when other white men, who were called patrols, caught colored people away from home without tickets, and were about to whip them, Mr. Brown would ride up and say, “The first man who raises a whip at one of those negroes I will blow his brains out.”

    My Life In The South

  • He ate, drank and slept among colored people after he was a grown man, and in many cases when other white men, who were called patrols, caught colored people away from home without tickets and were about to whip them, Mr. Brown rode up and would say, "the first man who raises a whip at one of those negroes, I will blow his brains out."

    My Life in the South

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