Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of philander.
  • n. The action of philandering.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Flirting; “spooning.”

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His philandering is a now well established fact in political lore, and in National history, with his "impeachment" over sexual conduct with an intern, within the White House.

    Bill Clinton lashes out at Vanity Fair reporter

  • Or blame it on the idea that, since Mr. Strauss-Kahn is well-known as a philandering rogue, he must perforce also be a brute.

    The DSK Lesson

  • At least one wife has learned, when she boots her husband out, that his philandering has been a form of bullying.

    Adultery Carnival: John Updike's Couples and the Sexual Revolution

  • Denise McCarthy Goward, a relative of Kingston's long-suffering wife, Lucy McCarthy, said his philandering was the talk of the town in Adelaide at the turn of the last century.

    Philanderer Dug Up Down Under

  • I dunno about his vanity, but I think the "philandering" part has been established to be more than a "tabloid image", don't you?

    Response: We were Tommy Sheridan's loyal comrades, not his harem

  • She accepted his 'philandering' as she kept stating she didn't want anything more than just a casual friendship.

    Passwords, statistics and lies we tell ourselves

  • BAKER: Running for office, running for the White House would be a good thing because in the White House, surrounded by all of the press corps and secret service and so forth, you know, and the majesty of the office, that these would discourage her husband from the kind of philandering that he had done in Arkansas.

    CNN Transcript May 27, 2007

  • BAKER: Running for office, running for the White House would be a good thing because, you know, in the White House, surrounded by all of the press corps and Secret Service and so forth, you know, and the majesty of the office, that these would, you know, discourage her husband from the kind of philandering that he had done in Arkansas.

    CNN Transcript May 25, 2007

  • On occasions they sat like this for an hour or so, "philandering," Trina cuddling herself down upon McTeague's enormous body, rubbing her cheek against the grain of his unshaven chin, kissing the bald spot on the top of his head, or putting her fingers into his ears and eyes.

    McTeague

  • "I certainly shouldn't, for I don't know what 'philandering' means."

    A Phyllis of the Sierras

Comments

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  • Penny Arcade (04/23/10):

    "You know what else is cool? Philandering. How does one get started with that?"

    June 8, 2010

  • "Writing in next month's issue of the journal Human Nature, a team led by Paul Andrews of Virginia Commonwealth University report that in their study of 203 young couples, men's hunches about fidelity or infidelity were 94 per cent correct. Women got it right only 80 per cent of the time.

    Dr Andrews's group found men were more likely to catch a philandering partner, detecting 75 per cent of infidelities, compared with 41 per cent caught out by women."

    - Leigh Dayton, 'Men's suspicious minds better at spotting infidelity', The Australian, 14 Nov 2008.

    November 14, 2008