Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Love of Greece.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Love of Greece.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Love of Greece; the principles of the Philhellenes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. admiration for Greece and the Greeks and Greek customs

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Large parts of Turkish Anatolia and Thrace were assigned to Greece to satisfy the ambitions of Prime Minister Venizelos and the philhellenism of Lloyd George, or to France to indulge a romantic conceit about her special relationship with the Levant going back to the crusades and the Napoleonic wars.

    The peace to end all peace

  • The poet Byron was the apotheosis of philhellenism, journeying to Greece to join its fight for independence, and his disappointment in the real-live Greeks he met sounds like so many contemporary encounters of Westerners with the Third World.

    Help Is on the Way

  • The birthplace of the forerunners of the modern social and civic spirit and the mother of the most genuine philhellenism, the

    The New York Times Current History, A Monthly Magazine The European War, March 1915

  • When will your Cretan volume, crowned [Untranslatable pun on the words "cretois" and "crete."] with erudition and philhellenism, be finished?

    Letters

  • Euphrosunes, for government employ, and the memorial survives, attested by bishop and clergy, of a man with a daughter to marry, who being too poor to find a dowry 'had decided on reverting to your Excellency's well-known philhellenism, and with tears in his eyes besought that your

    The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3) 1809-1859

  • The literary philhellenism of the present age, and especially its philologic tendency is fast hunting the classic spectres of the heroic times into primeval shade.

    Macaria; or, Altars of Sacrifice

  • Its adoption was a triumph of classical philhellenism over common sense, of Cavafy's 'serious and stately' image over reality; and as we have already noted, it has not ceased to be a divisive and stultifying force in the contemporary Greek state.

    American Chronicle

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