physiognomical love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to physiognomy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as physiognomic.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

physiognomy +‎ -ical

Examples

  • With that, and with an expression of face in which a great number of opposite ingredients, such as mischief, cunning, malice, triumph, and patient expectation, were all mixed up together in a kind of physiognomical punch, Miss Miggs composed herself to wait and listen, like some fair ogress who had set a trap and was watching for a nibble from a plump young traveller.

    Barnaby Rudge

  • And one final note: Pod has "a round, currant-bunny sort of face", not Christopher Eccleston's bony beauty: cosy 50s baker, not Gotterdammerung in physiognomical form.

    TV review: The Borrowers; The Royal Bodyguard

  • Based in Aristotelian physiognomical inference (Prior Analytics II 27, 70b 7 – 4 and the Ps-Aristotelian third century b.c. e. treatise Physiognomy) was rooted in many disciplines, such as medicine (Galen), rhetorics (Polemo), and ethics.

    Gender Identity In Halakhic Discourse.

  • Saints, knew as well what work he was at, as their countryman Le Brun could have known it himself, though he had made that English traveller the subject of a special physiognomical treatise.

    Little Dorrit

  • In like manner, his physiognomical expression seemed to teem with benignity.

    Little Dorrit

  • Grinder to her arms, who embraced her with a face of unutterable woe, and like a victim as he was, resumed his former seat, close by the side of his venerable friend, whom he suffered, not without much constrained sweetness of countenance, combating very expressive physiognomical revelations of an opposite character to draw his arm through hers, and keep it there.

    Dombey and Son

  • That was the only physiognomical attention her visage would receive.

    The Romance of China: Excursions to China in U.S. Culture: 1776-1876

  • He could use the ancient sculptures of Greece and Rome — they represented physiognomical perfection in their “Harmony” and “Proportion” — as the standard against which all human forms were to be measured.

    The Romance of China: Excursions to China in U.S. Culture: 1776-1876

  • As he observed the unclothed Chinese bodies, Taylor gathered the visual evidence required for the following physiognomical assessment: 35

    The Romance of China: Excursions to China in U.S. Culture: 1776-1876

  • Amateurs in the physiognomical and phrenological sciences roved about him with watchful eyes and itching fingers, and sometimes one, more daring than the rest, made a mad grasp at the back of his head, and vanished in the crowd.

    The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

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