Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The fact that "pito" is Spanish for part of the male anatomy was not lost on anyone on the Iberian peninsula.

    It's Always Something With Balotelli

  • Three men traveling through the village have stopped to cool themselves and drink some of the local brew, called "pito."

    BusinessWeek.com -- Top News

  • The "pito" is a small, brown, speckled bird, with yellow belly, and there were great numbers of them flying about.

    The Forest Exiles The Perils of a Peruvian Family in the Wilds of the Amazon

  • He pointed out a rock-woodpecker, which he called a "pito" (_Colaptes rupicola_), that was fluttering about and flying from rock to rock.

    The Forest Exiles The Perils of a Peruvian Family in the Wilds of the Amazon

  • Arguments routinely started over pito , Spanish for whistle, but a vulgarity in Puerto Rico.

    Talking Basketball, in Spanish, Is Definitely No Slam Dunk

  • Comfort moved to a shabby room in a compound where she could brew and serve pito, charging the equivalent of a few pennies for a smooth calabash bowl of the yeasty liquid.

    Spellbound

  • Finally, ten months after he drank the pito, the doctors suggested he go to Kumasi for surgery.

    Spellbound

  • He believed his father had died not because the pito had been improperly fermented, nor because his father had contracted a strange stomach ailment, but because his grandmother practiced witchcraft.

    Spellbound

  • People drowned their hardships in fermented pito, a millet-based brew, and akpateshie, the fiery local moonshine.

    Spellbound

  • In the days before poisoned pito made witchcraft personal, Carlos had a dream in which he saw a big black dog trying to bite him and awoke to see bite marks between the thumb and index finger of his right hand.

    Spellbound

Comments

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  • a whistle and/or wail

    August 17, 2012

  • "'From there one can sometimes see a band of vicuñas, and quite often too the small fluttering rock-creeper we call a pito...'"
    --O'Brian, The Wine-Dark Sea, 183

    March 14, 2008