Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a box for a child's toys and personal things (especially at a boarding school)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A large book, interleaved with blotting-paper, was disinterred from the play-box, and Bobbie sat down before it solemnly.

    Soap-Bubble Stories For Children

  • The labour of packing my play-box and writing labels for my luggage had given me a momentary thrill, but for the rest I had moved among my insurgent comrades with a chilled heart.

    The Ghost Ship

  • Dutch cheese, keep it carefully in your play-box or in your desk; but don't let your white mice get at it.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 102, May 21, 1892

  • Don't know your own purse-strings, "spluttered the denouncer, growing incoherent with rising fury;" sit at home with your little play-box of a works down here, with fancy hutches for your rabbits of workmen, clubs, toys, kitchen ranges, hot and cold laid on.

    Christopher Hibbault, Roadmaker

  • I was conscious that the place had an unpleasant smell, and I was already driven to thinking of my pocket-money and my play-box -- agreeable thoughts which I had made up my mind in the train to reserve carefully for possible hours of unhappiness.

    The Ghost Ship

  • But I was bound to go, for I wanted some wire to finish a cage I was making for my dormouse, who was running loose in my play-box and making everything in an awful mess.

    Adventures in Many Lands

  • I thought strenuously of my brother's stories, of my play-box packed for a voyage, of the money in my pocket increased now by my eldest brother's unexpected generosity; and by dint of these violent mental exercises I had reduced my mind to a comfortable stupor by the time I reached the school gates.

    The Ghost Ship

  • There was a little door in it, which opened on their ringing; and a clumsy, untidy man came out and fetched Philip's tin trunk and his play-box.

    Of Human Bondage

  • When his trunk and play-box were sent in, the approaching cleavage between our brother, who now belonged to the future, and ourselves, still claimed by the past, was accentuated indeed.

    The Golden Age

  • There was a little door in it, which opened on their ringing; and a clumsy, untidy man came out and fetched Philip's tin trunk and his play-box.

    Of Human Bondage

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