Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An obsolete form of plethora.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Plethora.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Obsolete form of plethora.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Senator Obama has a plethory of candidates to choose from.

    McCain to make SNL appearance

  • What was it to you if that half reality, the husband, was overreached by the puppetry -- or the thin thing (Lady Teazle's reputation) was persuaded it was dying of a plethory?

    English literary criticism

  • But as to the king whose plethory was cured by that sharp remedy, he, Louis the Sixteenth, was only dragged to a fate which, if he had not experienced it, he would be acknowledged to have deserved.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 53, No. 330, April 1843

  • Highland in Belford, which, in the days of our plethory, sold readily for from fifty to one hundred dollars the acre, (and such sales were many then,) would not now sell for more than from ten to twenty dollars, or one-quarter or one-fifth of its former price. —

    The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia

  • It is, indeed, owing to a plethory of matter that his style is so faulty [743].

    Life of Johnson

  • Since writing the above I feel confirmed that “pleurisy” is the right word; for I find that in the old medical dictionaries the pleurisy is often called the “plethory.”

    Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher

  • Theobald's note from Warburton, who conjectures 'plethory.'

    Literary Remains, Volume 2

  • Since writing the above I feel confirmed that 'pleurisy' is the right word; for I find that in the old medical dictionaries the pleurisy is often called the 'plethory.'

    Literary Remains, Volume 2

  • Highland in Bedford, which, in the days of our plethory, sold readily for from fifty to one hundred dollars the acre (and such sales were many then), would not now sell for more than from ten to twenty dollars, or one quarter or one fifth of its former price.

    Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 4

  • It is, indeed, owing to a plethory of matter that his style is so faulty [743].

    Life of Johnson, Volume 3 1776-1780

Comments

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  • "'I do not think the gunroom's turtle was quite wholesome.'

    "'Nonsense,' said Stephen. 'Never was such a healthy, clean-run reptile. The trouble is, you ate too much, as you did the day before, and as you do habitually.... You are at present suffering from a plethory, a common plethory.'"

    --Patrick O'Brian, The Nutmeg of Consolation, 270

    March 9, 2008