Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Scotch corruptions of portmanteau.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And, as I said, ye may take it on trust, that that’s been ane o’ the men killed there, and that it’s been the gipsies that took your pockmanky when they fand the chaise stickin’ in the snaw—they wadna pass the like o’ that—it wad just come to their hand like the bowl o’ a pint stoup.

    Chapter XLV

  • "It's been the gipsies that took your pockmanky, when they fand the chaise stickin 'in the snaw; they wadna pass the like o' that: it wad just come to their hand like the bowl o 'a pintstoup."

    The Proverbs of Scotland

  • "Brawly, Mr. Dusterdeevil -- brawly do I ken ye, and has done mony a day; but there's nae jesting in the case, for I am wearying to see ae our treasures; we should hae had baith ends o 'the pockmanky filled by this time -- I hope it's bowk eneugh to haud a' the gear?"

    The Antiquary — Volume 02

  • And, as I said, ye may take it on trust that that's been ane o 'the men killed there, and that it's been the gipsies that took your pockmanky when they fand the chaise stickin' in the snaw; they wadna pass the like o 'that, it wad just come to their hand like the bowl o' a pint stoup. '

    Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Volume 02

  • And, as I said, ye may take it on trust that that's been ane o 'the men killed there, and that it's been the gipsies that took your pockmanky when they fand the chaise stickin' in the snaw; they wadna pass the like

    Guy Mannering — Complete

  • o 'the pockmanky filled by this time --- I hope it's bowk eneugh to haud a' the gear? ''

    The Antiquary

  • And, as I said, ye may take it on trust that that’s been ane o’ the men killed there, and that it’s been the gipsies that took your pockmanky when they fand the chaise stickin’ in the snaw; they wadna pass the like o’ that, it wad just come to their hand like the bowl o’ a pint stoup.’

    Guy Mannering

  • “Brawly, Mr. Dusterdeevil — brawly do I ken ye, and has done mony a day; but there’s nae jesting in the case, for I am wearying to see ae our treasures; we should hae had baith ends o’ the pockmanky filled by this time — I hope it’s bowk eneugh to haud

    The Antiquary

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