Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A mischievous spirit in Irish folklore.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Irish tradition, a spirit or spook in the form of a horse.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A fairy that appears in animal form, often large. It appears only to some people.
  • noun A convenient storage location or hiding spot created by the arrangement or form of surrounding objects
  • verb The act of storing an object in a pooka

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Irish púca, from Old Irish, probably from Old English pūca, goblin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Irish púca ("goblin, sprite").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Hawaiian puka ("hole").

Examples

Comments

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  • Harvey

    February 14, 2007

  • "P O O K A - Pooka - from old Celtic mythology - a fairy spirit in animal form - always very large. The pooka appears here and there - now and then - to this one and that one - a benign but mischievous creature - very fond of rumpots, crackpots, and how are you, Mr. Wilson?"

    September 23, 2007

  • Palooka need to add pooka!

    September 24, 2007

  • "'Phat’s the Pooka? Well, that’s not aisy to say. It’s an avil sper’t that does be always in mischief, but sure it niver does sarious harrum axceptin’ to thim that desarves it, or thim that shpakes av it disrespictful. I never seen it, Glory be to God, but there’s thim that has, and be the same token, they do say that it looks like the finest black horse that iver wore shoes. But it isn’t a horse at all at all, for no horse ’ud have eyes av fire, or be breathin’ flames av blue wid a shmell o’ sulfur, savin’ yer presince, or a shnort like thunder, and no mortial horse ’ud take the lapes it does, or go as fur widout gettin’ tired."

    - D. R. McAnally, Jr., 'Irish Wonders', 1938.

    July 15, 2012

  • Elwood P. Dowd's invisible friend was named Harvey in the 1950 movie bearing that pooka's name.

    March 27, 2015