Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A boy who rides post; a boy or man who carries mail; the driver of a post-chaise; a postilion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who rides post horses; a position; a courier.
  • noun A boy who carries letters from the post.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun historical A male postilion.
  • noun A boy who carries letters from the post.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

post +‎ boy

Examples

  • The SKYDSGUT, or so-called postboy, for the next stage of the journey, was a full-grown man of considerable weight.

    Fisherman's Luck and Some Other Uncertain Things

  • There was no mail coach -- no driver in scarlet -- no mail guard -- no passengers, but only a ramshackle iron mail cart -- a "postboy" as driver and carrying no arms.

    The King's Post Being a volume of historical facts relating to the posts, mail coaches, coach roads, and railway mail services of and connected with the ancient city of Bristol from 1580 to the present time

  • Afterward, he blamed it on transportation limits, the postboy, the fact that the newspapers were three or four days old by the time he read them over toast and coffee.

    The Laugh

  • Afterward, he blamed it on transportation limits, the postboy, the fact that the newspapers were three or four days old by the time he read them over toast and coffee.

    The Laugh

  • The postboy looked her up and down, noting that she was pretty, and about his own age.

    The Dressmaker

  • As I said, the big thing people forget about Nigella is that she's a big famous glamorous TV star from a very well-connected, rich and high-profile family - I sincerely doubt that a Nigella lookalike whose dad was a postman and who worked in a shop would come within light years of landing a Saatchi and Saatchi postboy.

    Fat Is A Fantasist Issue

  • These mail-wagons were two-wheeled cabriolets, upholstered inside with fawn-colored leather, hung on springs, and having but two seats, one for the postboy, the other for the traveller.

    Les Miserables

  • Here he produced a decanter of curiously light wine, and a block of curiously heavy cake, and administered installments of those dainties to the young people: at the same time, sending out a meagre servant to offer a glass of something to the postboy, who answered that he thanked the gentleman, but if it was the same tap as he had tasted before, he had rather not.

    A Christmas Carol

  • The postboy was driving briskly through the open streets, and past the handsome and well – lighted shops that intervene between the outskirts of the town and the Old Royal Hotel, before Mr. Pickwick had begun to consider the very difficult and delicate nature of the commission which had carried him thither.

    The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

  • ‘This way, gentlemen; don’t trouble yourselves about the postboy now, sir.

    The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

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