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Examples

  • Four-score and many happy returns to another game's preux chevalier, and with a similar aura.

    My dream job as Bobby Moore's minder for a fortnight | Frank Keating

  • To cling, as Mary Chesnut did, to the tradition of the preux chevalier seemed to him an extravagance.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • To cling, as Mary Chesnut did, to the tradition of the preux chevalier seemed to him an extravagance.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • To cling, as Mary Chesnut did, to the tradition of the preux chevalier seemed to him an extravagance.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • To cling, as Mary Chesnut did, to the tradition of the preux chevalier seemed to him an extravagance.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • To cling, as Mary Chesnut did, to the tradition of the preux chevalier seemed to him an extravagance.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • There are also said to be 243 “free brothers” known as “valiants” preux or the Children of St. Vincent, without voting rights—a separate but affiliated order said to have been formed in 1681.

    The Sion Revelation

  • There are also said to be 243 “free brothers” known as “valiants” preux or the Children of St. Vincent, without voting rights—a separate but affiliated order said to have been formed in 1681.

    The Sion Revelation

  • There are also said to be 243 “free brothers” known as “valiants” preux or the Children of St. Vincent, without voting rights—a separate but affiliated order said to have been formed in 1681.

    The Sion Revelation

  • “Quel preux Chevalier!” cried the Sylphide, tossing up her little head.

    The History of Pendennis

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  • From the Urban Dictionary: It most literally translates from archaic French as "valiant," and is often combined with the phrase "preux chevalier" which means "valiant knight." It's common usage in the English language may be partially attributed to the author P.G. Wodehouse in his tales of Bertram Wooster, who would have learned to always be preux in his time at Eaton and Oxford.

    June 5, 2011