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Examples

  • When the solution is evaporated to dryness, the remainder has five cubic centimeters hydrochloric acid added to it, and the liquid is then brought to boiling in order that the perchloride of manganese possibly formed during the evaporation to dryness may be reduced to protochloride, after which the solution is diluted with water till it measures about 100 cubic centimeters.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 324, March 18, 1882

  • The dissolving of the fused mass in hydrochloric acid does not need to be carried to dryness for the separation of the soluble silica, but the boiling, after the addition of a little nitric acid, is only kept up until the iron passes into perchloride and the manganese into protochloride.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 324, March 18, 1882

  • If we dissolve black oxide of manganese, permanganate of potash, or any other compound of manganese of a higher degree of oxidation than the protoxide in hydrochloric acid, we obtain, as is well known, a dark colored solution of perchloride of manganese, which, when heated to boiling loses color pretty rapidly, chlorine being given off, until finally only protochloride remains.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 324, March 18, 1882

  • A large excess of bicarbonate ought to be avoided, because in a solution of pure protochloride of manganese it renders the liquid milky and turbid; the addition of more water, however, makes it clear.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 324, March 18, 1882

  • For brassing small articles: To one quart water add half an ounce each of sulphate copper and protochloride of tin.

    Burroughs' Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information, 1889

  • At the positive pole, hypochlorite of iron seems to be formed at first, but this is quickly changed into a protochloride, and as at the negative pole an alkaline reaction takes place, the iron salt is precipitated in the form of the ferrous hydrated oxide, together with the organic matters in suspension and solution.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 799, April 25, 1891

  • The following process for making photographic copies of drawings in blue lines on white background was invented by H. Pellet, and is based on the property of perchloride of iron of being converted into protochloride on exposure to light.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 514, November 7, 1885

  • Those parts protected from the light by the lines of the drawing immediately turn blue, while the rest of the paper, where the coating has been converted into protochloride by the effects of light, will remain white.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 514, November 7, 1885

  • Prussiate of potash when brought into contact with the perchloride of iron immediately turns the latter blue, but it does not affect the protochloride.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 514, November 7, 1885

  • The solution of protochloride of iron is obtained by dissolving iron nails, &c., in concentrated HCl, the iron being in excess.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

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