Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To cross a second time.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun law An examination of a witness, following redirect, by the opposing party.
  • verb To cross again.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

re- +‎ cross

Examples

  • The northern party had to turn back, recross the Potomac, and take the Winchester road.

    George Washington’s First War

  • The northern party had to turn back, recross the Potomac, and take the Winchester road.

    George Washington’s First War

  • Could even argue folks are out there looking to cross & recross this line in their lives as a way of defining it's edge.

    This and/or that

  • Even Charlie looked vaguely uncomfortable, shifting in her seat to recross her legs.

    Brush of Darkness

  • Even Charlie looked vaguely uncomfortable, shifting in her seat to recross her legs.

    Brush of Darkness

  • Basing her work on far-flung archives, Ms. Jasanoff takes us on a global voyage from North America to Europe, Africa and even India — and back again — as her subjects cross and recross the Atlantic in search of an elusive utopia.

    The Refugees Who Built an Empire

  • The northern party had to turn back, recross the Potomac, and take the Winchester road.

    George Washington’s First War

  • The northern party had to turn back, recross the Potomac, and take the Winchester road.

    George Washington’s First War

  • The skeins of their flight rise and fall, expand and contract, circle above, cross and recross, the light altered by their dark little bodies in the shadow and the ping of refracted beams off their wings when they zip across the open yard.

    See?

  • Madero crossed into Mexico with a few followers, the large force he was expecting didn't materialize, and he was forced to recross the border.

    Glorious innocent: the tragedy and triumph of Francisco Madero (1873–1913)

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