Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of or pertaining to a rector or a rectory.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Pertaining to a rector or a rectory; rectoral.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Relating to a rector.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Can't you call on them, Pobs?" suggested Diana, "A sort of 'rectorial' visit, you know.

    The Splendid Folly

  • We now come to my favorite passage:In his infamous rectorial address, Martin Heidegger looked forward to the time — hastened by Hitler's efforts — "when the spiritual strength of the West fails and its joints crack, when the moribund semblance of culture caves in and drags all forces into confusion and lets them suffocate in madness." pp.

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • Has he done anything more than quote a passage from the rectorial address?

    enowning

  • Has he done anything more than quote a passage from the rectorial address?

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • We now come to my favorite passage:In his infamous rectorial address, Martin Heidegger looked forward to the time — hastened by Hitler's efforts — "when the spiritual strength of the West fails and its joints crack, when the moribund semblance of culture caves in and drags all forces into confusion and lets them suffocate in madness." pp.

    enowning

  • Herein the righteousness of God, as the rectorial virtue of the divine nature, was concerned in the sin and apostasy of men.

    Christologia

  • In 1882 he was elected lord rector of the university of Glasgow, and Dr Dale wrote of his rectorial address: "It was not the old Bright."

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • A citizen who offended the University was debarred from all intercourse with students, who were strictly forbidden to hire his house or his books; if a townsman brought a "calumnious accusation" against a student, and disobeyed a rectorial command to desist, he and his children, to the third generation, and all their goods, were to lie under an interdict,

    Life in the Medieval University

  • The records, of Florence afford an illustration of the checks upon the rectorial power, to which we have referred in speaking of the typical

    Life in the Medieval University

  • The writer has in his possession a copy of the deed, conveying, in the first year of Edward VI., the rectorial rights and appurtenances of

    Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter

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