Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Nautical, a tackle fastened to the leeches of a sail below the close-reef band, used to haul the leeches of the sail up to the yard to facilitate reefing.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now haul the weather reef-tackle likewise midship, snug up to the yard, belay all down the tack, and sheet aft.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 829, November 21, 1891

  • The operation is performed by easing of the sheet and hauling the lee reef-tackle first, also the midship reef tackle.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 829, November 21, 1891

  • We had a great advantage over the larboard watch, because the chief mate never goes aloft, while our new second mate used to jump into the rigging as soon as we began to haul out the reef-tackle, and have the weather earing passed before there was a man upon the yard.

    Chapter IV. A Rogue-Trouble on Board-“Land Ho!”-Pompero-Cape Horn

  • We had a great advantage over the larboard watch, because the chief mate never goes aloft, while our new second mate used to jump into the rigging as soon as we began to haul out the reef-tackle, and have the weather earing passed before there was a man upon the yard.

    Two years before the mast, and twenty-four years after: a personal narrative

  • Before the sailors had made fast the reef-tackle, Jackson was tottering up the rigging; thus getting the start of them, and securing his place at the extreme weather-end of the topsail-yard -- which in reefing is accounted the post of honor.

    Redburn. His First Voyage

  • We had a great advantage over the larboard watch, because the chief mate never goes aloft, while our new second mate used to jump into the rigging as soon as we began to haul out the reef-tackle, and have the weather earing passed before there was a man upon the yard.

    Two Years Before the Mast

  • The reef-tackle was rounded cautiously in, and its end rose to the surface without the hand that had so lately grasped it.

    Homeward Bound or, the Chase

  • The seaman on the other yard-arm succeeded equally well, escaping the smallest injury, until he had secured the leachline, when, knowing the usefulness of, obtaining it, for he was on the weather side of the ship, he determined to bring in the end of the reef-tackle with him.

    Homeward Bound or, the Chase

  • -- The end of the reef-tackle, that had been so dearly bought, was got in, by means of a light line, which was thrown around it.

    Homeward Bound or, the Chase

  • "Well, that's a cur'ous kind o 'guess you've made, any way, old stranger," laughed his tormentor, clapping his foot against the companion, and taking the pull of a giant on the reef-tackle as he spoke.

    Impressions of America During The Years 1833, 1834, and 1835. In Two Volumes, Volume II.

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