Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To send or order back, especially.
  • transitive verb To send back (a person) into legal custody, as to a jail or prison.
  • transitive verb To send (a case) from a higher to a lower court, as when an appellate court determines that the trial court needs to hold a new trial or engage in additional proceedings.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To send, call, or order back: as, to remand an officer from a distant place.
  • In law, to send back, as a prisoner, on refusing his application to be discharged, or a cause from an appellate court to the court of original jurisdiction.
  • noun The state of being remanded, recommitted, or held over; the act of remanding.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To recommit; to send back.
  • noun The act of remanding; the order for recommitment.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of sending an accused person back into custody whilst awaiting trial.
  • noun The act of an appellate court sending a matter back to a lower court for review or disposal.
  • verb To send a case back to a lower court for further consideration.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the act of sending an accused person back into custody to await trial (or the continuation of the trial)
  • verb lock up or confine, in or as in a jail
  • verb refer (a matter or legal case) to another committee or authority or court for decision

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English remaunden, from Old French remander, from Late Latin remandāre, to send back word : Latin re-, re- + Latin mandāre, to order; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Remand is a legal term which has two related but distinct usages. Its etymology is from the Latin re- and mandare, literally "to order." It evolved in Late Latin to remandare, or "to send back word." It appears in Middle French as remander and in Middle English as remaunden, both with essentially the same meaning, "to send back."

Examples

  • Could it be an order sending a case back to a previous court nisi prius, if you will similar to the use of the term remand in those situations?

    Define That Term #22

  • Mr Cash said, Jack has sought love to overcome his grief at the loss of Jade, and while in remand has had a whirlwind courtship with his new love, his cellmate armed robber 'Reamer' McGee on C Block.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Mr Cash said, Jack has sought love to overcome his grief at the loss of Jade, and while in remand has had a whirlwind courtship with his new love, his cellmate armed robber 'Reamer' McGee on C Block.

    Jack Tweed to Remarry

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

  • Presumably even a substantially revamped CSRT, on remand from the D.C. Circuit, would not issue revised detention decisions for quite some time -- to be followed by yet further D.C. Circuit review.

    Balkinization

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