Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who sacrifices.
  • noun Specifically, a priest.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who sacrifices.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Someone who sacrifices.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a religious person who offers up a sacrifice

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Trapp is angry that he calls the sacrificer in the Georgicks

    Lives of the Poets, Volume 1

  • The sacrificer is the one who takes the leap for her friends, and in tough times, we lean on this person, who will answer her phone in the dead of night to console you.

    Therese Borchard: 10 Types Of Female Friends: How Many Do You Have?

  • “He,” that is, the sacrificer, denotes the person of

    A Brief Declaration and Vindication of The Doctrine of the Trinity

  • In their essence sacrifices are not popular festivals or holidays but private services, performed for the benefit of the sacrificer, that is, the person who pays the fees of the priests.

    Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 1

  • _ 359 Śatakratu_, Lord of a hundred sacrifices, the performance of a hundred _Aśvamedhas_ or sacrifices of a horse entitling the sacrificer to this exalted dignity.

    Ramayana. English

  • The sacrificer is the one who takes the leap for her friends, and in tough times, we lean on this person, who will answer her phone in the dead of night to console you.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • After appropriate offerings were made, the priestess replied in verse: “The bull is ready for slaughter, the end is near, the sacrificer is present.”

    Alexander the Great

  • It was a typically ambiguous response from Delphi, but Philip chose to interpret it favorably, seeing the bull as Persia and himself as the sacrificer.

    Alexander the Great

  • After appropriate offerings were made, the priestess replied in verse: “The bull is ready for slaughter, the end is near, the sacrificer is present.”

    Alexander the Great

  • It was a typically ambiguous response from Delphi, but Philip chose to interpret it favorably, seeing the bull as Persia and himself as the sacrificer.

    Alexander the Great

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