Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Affected or marked by sclerosis.
  • adj. Anatomy Of or relating to the sclera.
  • n. See sclera.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the sclera
  • adj. Having sclerosis
  • adj. Hard and insular, often in sclerotic bureaucracy

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Hard; firm; indurated; -- applied especially in anatomy to the firm outer coat of the eyeball, which is often cartilaginous and sometimes bony.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the sclerotic coat of the eye; sclerotical.
  • adj. Affected with sclerosis; sclerosed.
  • n. The sclerotic coat of the eye. See Illust. of eye (d).
  • adj. Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained from ergot or the sclerotium of a fungus growing on rye.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to or of the nature of sclerosis.
  • Related to or derived from ergot. Also sclerotinic.
  • n. Same as sclerotica.
  • n. A medicine which hardens and consolidates the parts to which it is applied.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to the sclera of the eyeball
  • adj. relating to or having sclerosis; hardened

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In his critique of the traditional Shia clergy -- a group that he described as sclerotic and superstitious, enemies of progress and true Islam -- Shariati had exempted Khomeini, praising him for his fierce fight against despotism and colonialism.

    The New Republic - All Feed

  • Right now, if you have a bad aortic valve--if you have advanced heart disease, or most people who age develop what's called a sclerotic aortic valve, their aortic valve literally becomes brittle and hard and doesn't open well, and those patients can go into heart failure, and a lot of them are just too sick for surgery.

    Class War Stories

  • Lining the inner surface of the sclerotic is the second coat, the choroid.

    A Practical Physiology

  • More to the point: literary study may or may not have become "sclerotic" pre-theory, but so what?

    Literary Study

  • Publication of WikiLeaks sourced private US comments on the corruption and nepotism of a hated "sclerotic" regime is said to have helped create Tunisia's protest, and generated talk by US commentators of a "Wikileaks revolution".

    Tunisia: The WikiLeaks connection

  • In a confidential 2009 U.S. cable leaked recently by WikiLeaks, an official wrote that Mr. Ben Ali's rule had degenerated into a "sclerotic" regime.

    Tunisians Oust President

  • He rejects the idea that Israel's salvation lies in alignment with the Saudis and other "sclerotic" Sunni regimes.

    MJ Rosenberg: Will Obama Buckle?

  • The diplomats report the tyrannical tendencies of the junta but also point out many problems with the "sclerotic" leadership of a democratic opposition and its undemocratic ways.

    Thestar.com - Home Page

  • Although a potential friend to America in the region, the country is troubled by nepotism, corruption, and the 'sclerotic' regime of ageing president Ben Ali.

    The Guardian World News

  • Warning that the MoD's bureaucracy was becoming "sclerotic", Air Chief Marshal, Sir Jock Stirrup, chief of the defence staff, added: "The growth in the number of people is hindering decision-making."

    The Guardian World News

Comments

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  • Citation (as noun) on nictitate.

    June 30, 2008

  • Sclerosis, as in a hardening of the arterial roads? My, what journalism we endure. I remember a Sydney performance poet called Cringeworthy who used to take this kind of stuff and turn it into bizarre, funny, chaotic soundscapes.

    December 5, 2007

  • I have noticed a sudden upsurge in the use of 'sclerotic' to describe Sydney's traffic problems. Probably an apt metaphor, but it is starting to grate.

    December 5, 2007