Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A European seashore plant (Eryngium maritimum) in the parsley family, having prickly leaves and dense heads of small blue or purplish flowers.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The eringo, Eryngium maritimum. Also sea-holm and sea-hulver. See eringo and Eryngium.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • (Bot.) An evergeen seashore plant (Eryngium maritimum). See eryngium.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The plant Eryngium maritimum.
  • noun More generally, any of several species of plants in the genus Eryngium.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun widely cultivated southern European acanthus with whitish purple-veined flowers
  • noun European evergreen eryngo with twisted spiny leaves naturalized on United States east coast; roots formerly used as an aphrodisiac

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • Ooh, I like this plant! It reminds me of the conversation we had recently about celery. (That wasn't on the celery page, I don't think... was it? Rolig will remember.)

    August 14, 2008

  • zelena zelena :)

    August 18, 2008

  • Aha! Thanks, pleth!

    August 18, 2008

  • I tried to grow a sea holly in my garden here in SC but it died. I think it requires the sandy soil of the littorals. But it is a neat plant.

    August 21, 2008

  • "In Elizabethan times in England, these plants were believed to be a strong aphrodisiac. They are named in a speech by Falstaff:

    “ "Let the sky rain potatoes;

    let it thunder to the tune of Green-sleeves,

    hail kissing-comfits and snow eringoes sea-holly,

    let there come a tempest of provocation..." ”

    —Falstaff, Act 5, scene v, "The Merry Wives of Windsor", William Shakespeare"

    --From the Wikipedia page for Eryngium maritimum.

    February 1, 2011