Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Motion sickness resulting from the pitching and rolling of a ship or boat in water, especially at sea.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state or condition of being seasick.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The peculiar sickness, characterized by nausea and prostration, which is caused by the pitching or rolling of a vessel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Nausea, dizziness etc caused by the motion of a ship; a form of motion sickness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun motion sickness experienced while traveling on water

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

seasick +‎ -ness.

Examples

  • "Maybe there is a head or two broken; 'tis mostly what we call seasickness, however."

    King Alfred's Viking A Story of the First English Fleet

  • Its called seasickness, duck, and it turns you green.

    Brooklyn

  • Its called seasickness, duck, and it turns you green.

    Brooklyn

  • Its called seasickness, duck, and it turns you green.

    Brooklyn

  • Luckily seasickness is never fatal and next day we were all ready for an excursion to Norham Castle, a very ruinous ruin.

    The Alpine Path: The Story of My Career

  • Melville called seasickness “that dreadful thing.”

    John Paul Jones

  • Melville called seasickness “that dreadful thing.”

    John Paul Jones

  • The steady rocking motion of a ship also stimulates the semicircular canals, and to those who are not used to this overstimu-lation the result often is seasickness, which is an extremely unpleasant, though not really fatal affliction.

    The Human Brain

  • She was sure her seasickness was the worst that had ever been known, but we all feel that.

    Molly Brown's Orchard Home

  • She was prostrated by seasickness, which is no respecter of persons, and a more forlorn, unhappy mortal I never expect to see.

    Brave and Bold The Fortunes of Robert Rushton

Comments

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  • "There is no use fighting it and no use dosing yourself with medicines or pickles or lemons or fat meat. Nothing can cure it. In spite of everything it will stay with you until it has worked its will to the uttermost, and then it will go away at last of its own accord, leaving you a wan, limp wreck. I may add, to correct a general impression, that it is impossible to become seasoned to seasickness. One attack does not render the victim immune from future recurrences...."

    --Walter Noble Burns, A Year with a Whaler, 88

    April 28, 2008