Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who secedes or withdraws from communion or association with an organization.
  • noun [capitalized] A member of the Secession Church in Scotland. See Secession Church, under secession.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who secedes.
  • noun (Eccl. Hist.) One of a numerous body of Presbyterians in Scotland who seceded from the communion of the Established Church, about the year 1733, and formed the Secession Church, so called.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One who secedes, such as from a country or organization

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

secede +‎ -er

Examples

  • Methodists, and the Roman Catholics had expressed very openly, and no sooner did he, by an equal exertion of his intellect, point put the most feasible method of solving the difficulty, than a storm of abuse most lavishly bespattered him, and he was called a seceder from the

    Canada and the Canadians, Vol. 2

  • Sir John Hawkins [1] represents himself as a 'seceder' from this society, and assigns as the reason of his 'withdrawing' himself from it, that its late hours were inconsistent with his domestick arrangements.

    Life Of Johnson

  • Popular former Mayor Bill White won a resounding victory in the Democratic primary and will face right-wing seceder-in-chief Governor Rick Perry.

    Why Democrats Can Win Texas

  • Popular former Mayor Bill White won a resounding victory in the Democratic primary and will face right-wing seceder-in-chief Governor Rick Perry.

    Nathan Daschle: Why Democrats Can Win Texas

  • In the 47th chapter on the “Nature of Good,” St. Augustine admits that when our heretics were reproached with the crimes in question, they replied that one of their elect, a seceder from the sect, and become their enemy, had introduced this enormity.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • L.uisiana, and then excluded William L. Yancey, a representative seceder, and let in Pierre Soulé, a representative Douglasite.

    A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3

  • "And is it Landry, the recreant, the apostate, the only seceder of our family from the just cause, who speaks thus?" said the old woman lifting her head with a haggard expression.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

  • The next seceder ambitiously chose the name of a Prussian city -- _Berlin_.

    The Bay State Monthly — Volume 2, No. 5, February, 1885

  • Convention, and a seceder with General Butler from the Convention at

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 08, No. 49, November, 1861

  • Gissing, incorrigible seceder from responsibilities that did not touch his soul, did not dare tell his benefactor the horrid truth.

    Where the Blue Begins

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