Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of shend.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of shend, for shendeth.
  • transitive v. To shend.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Preterit and past participle of shend.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And you owe your present shituation to forces he has shent in purshuit of you?

    The Lives of Felix Gunderson

  • He now needs decoding: looking up "" fardels '' and "" bodkin, '' disentangling syntax: "" How in my words somever she be shent, '' says Hamlet before confronting his mother, "" To give them seals, never, my soul, consent! ''

    Shakespeare

  • It drifted with them at the will of the winds and the waves, night and day a great while, till their victual was spent and they saw themselves shent and were reduced to extreme hunger and thirst and exhaustion, when behold, suddenly they sighted an island from afar and the breezes wafted them on, till they came thither.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So he bore with his injurious usage, saying to himself, Verily insolence and evil-speaking are causes of perdition and cast into confusion, and it is said, ‘The insolent is shent and the ignorant doth repent; and whose feareth, to him safety is sent’: moderation marketh the noble and gentle manners are of gains the grandest.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And then they took their horses, and rode after to see how Sir Dagonet sped, for they would not for no good that Sir Dagonet were shent, for King Arthur loved him passing well, and made him knight with his own hands.

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

  • Fair sir, said the damosel, abate not your cheer for all this sight, for ye must courage yourself, or else ye be all shent, for all these knights came hither to this siege to rescue my sister

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

  • Do you hear how we are shent for keeping your greatness back?

    Act V. Scene II. Coriolanus

  • The Hebrew shíttah is probably a contraction of Shinttah, and thus identical with the Egyptian shent; the Coptic shonte, thorn; the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • Fair sir, said the damosel, abate not your cheer for all this sight, for ye must courage yourself, or else ye be all shent, for all these knights came hither to this siege to rescue my sister Dame Lionesse, and when the Red Knight of the Red Launds had overcome them, he put them to this shameful death without mercy and pity.

    Le Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table, Volume 1

  • The audience stormed us with delight, and I do believe I was having my share of the triumph, and might have been emboldened by success to have deserved it, had not all my sham tremors been shent -- in one moment -- by a shaft most real and memorable, whose fatal delivery I must now relate.

    The Fool Errant

Comments

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  • "FIRST GUARD: Do you hear how we are shent for keeping your greatness back?"

    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009