Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of syllable.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The French in his whole language, hath not one word that hath his accent in the last sillable, saving two, called Antepenultima; and little more hath the Spanish, and therefore verie gracelessly may they use Dactiles.

    Defence of Poesie

  • Lastly, even the verie Rime it selfe, the Italian cannot put it in the last sillable, by the French named the Masculine Rime; but still in the next to the last, which the French call the Female; or the next before that, which the Italian Sdrucciola: the example

    Defence of Poesie

  • Whether of these be the more excellent, wold bear many speeches, the ancient no doubt more fit for Musicke, both words and time observing quantitie, and more fit, lively to expresse divers passions by the low or loftie sound of the well-wayed sillable.

    Defence of Poesie

  • The auncient marked the quantitie of each sillable, and according to that, framed his verse: The moderne, observing onely number, with some regard of the accent; the chiefe life of it,

    Defence of Poesie

  • Although indeed the Senate of Poets hath chosen verse as their fittest raiment: meaning as in matter, they passed all in all, so in manner, to go beyond them: not speaking table talke fashion, or like men in a dreame, words as they chanceably fall from the mouth, but peasing each sillable of eache word by just proportion, according to the dignitie of the suject.

    Defence of Poesie

  • [Sidenote: Prosthesis.] _Appositio_, apposiciõ, the putting to, eyther of letter or sillable at the begynnyng of a worde, as: He all to bewretched hym.

    A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes

  • [Sidenote: Ectasis.] _Extensio_, the making lõg of a sillable whych by nature is short, as: This was ordeined by acte, for ordined.

    A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes

  • [Sidenote: Proparalepsis.] _Preassumpcio_, when a sillable is added to a word, the significacion of the worde therby nothyng altered, as: He vseth to slacken his matters, for to slacke his matters.

    A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes

  • [Sidenote: Epenthesis.] _Interpositio_, when a letter is added betwene the fyrste sillable of a word and the laste, as: Relligiõ for religion, relliques for reliques.

    A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes

  • And if a verse here and there fal out a sillable shorter or longer than another, I rather aret it to the negligence and rape of Adam Scrivener, that I may speak as Chaucer doth, than to any unconning or oversight in the Author.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57, No. 357, June, 1845

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