Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See radiograph.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of sciagraph.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • See sciagraph, sciagraphy, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as sciagraph.
  • Same as sciagraph.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

Etymologies

Greek skiā, shadow + -graph.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The moment the skiagraph was taken, it was very clear which bone should be removed.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • To take, therefore, a skiagraph of a brain through two thicknesses of skull, with our present methods, is an impossibility.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • Efforts, therefore, to skiagraph the heart, the lungs, the liver, and stomach, and all the pelvic organs, probably will be fruitless to a greater or less extent until our methods are improved.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • It would be manifestly an utter impossibility to skiagraph the many fractures which are seen there daily, considering that it would take from half an hour to an hour of the time of not less than two or three assistants skilled not only in surgery, but also in electricity, to skiagraph a single fracture.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • An attempt has been made by Rowland and Waggett. to skiagraph such foreign bodies, with encouraging results.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • Undoubtedly, as a result of the labors of so many scores of physicists and physicians as are now working at the problem, before long we shall be able to skiagraph at least the thinner parts of the body in a very brief interval.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • If our methods improve so that we can skiagraph through the entire body, it will be very possible to determine the presence and location of foreign bodies in the stomach and intestines.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • That we are not able at present to skiagraph the soft parts of the body, does not imply that we shall not be able to do it hereafter; and should this be possible, especially with our increasing ability to penetrate thick masses of tissue, it is evident, without entering into details, that the use of the X rays may be of immense importance in obstetrics.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • The Greek word for shadow is "skia," and the proper rendering, therefore, of shadowgraph is "skiagraph," corresponding to photograph.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

  • That the flesh or soft parts are not wholly permeable to the rays is well shown in the skiagraph -- i.e., a "shadow picture" -- of a foot.

    McClure's Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 6, May, 1896

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