Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of, pertaining to, or of the nature of slang: as, a slangy expression.
  • Addicted to the use of slang.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Including or given to slang.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective constituting or expressed in slang or given to the use of slang

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He at times almost verged on the slangy, which is, of course, quite correct and _de haut ton_, and he did not want to be taken for an old buffer, as were his contemporaries.

    Roden's Corner

  • See, a.fortis, now you've got me having to ask: what's the "slangy" meaning of "shorties?"

    The WritingYA Weblog: Shouts-Out--Because Who Doesn't Like a Shout-Out?

  • The three had recovered their composure, and were talking easily — just the kind of slangy talk you will hear in any golf club-house.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • The three had recovered their composure, and were talking easily—just the kind of slangy talk you will hear in any golf club-house.

    Various Parties converging on the Sea

  • The three had recovered their composure, and were talking easily -- just the kind of slangy talk you will hear in any golf club-house.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • The three had recovered their composure, and were talking easily -- just the kind of slangy talk you will hear in any golf club-house.

    The Thirty-Nine Steps

  • Just as the English are apt to find our humour "slangy" and

    My Discovery of England

  • To do that, there will be times when I'll need to understand slangy, off-color, and downright weird words -- all kinds -- if for no other reason than to understand what people around me are saying.

    Ensename, por favor!

  • Why does he use 'whole' and other slangy expressions?

    Omer Rosen: Footnoting David Foster Wallace: Part 1

  • In that sense, both childlike speech and slangy expression operate for Wallace as kin of free indirect discourse, here disguising as prose the speech or internal monologue of the author himself, rather than that of a character's.

    Omer Rosen: Footnoting David Foster Wallace: Part 1

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