tenement-house love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A house or block of buildings divided into dwellings occupied by separate families; technically, in the State of New York, any house occupied by more than three families.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The novice can catch the thrill of teaching folk-dancing to the tenement-house child or distributing bread tickets to the poor; but an offer to pay the expenses of a board of health 'cleanup campaign' requires imagination of a different order.

    Too Rich for Their Money

  • The novice can catch the thrill of teaching folk-dancing to the tenement-house child or distributing bread tickets to the poor; but an offer to pay the expenses of a board of health 'cleanup campaign' requires imagination of a different order.

    Too Rich for Their Money

  • The novice can catch the thrill of teaching folk-dancing to the tenement-house child or distributing bread tickets to the poor; but an offer to pay the expenses of a board of health 'cleanup campaign' requires imagination of a different order.

    Too Rich for Their Money

  • New York had had a tenement-house law since 1867; it seemed to have little impact.

    A History of American Law

  • The law, said the court, in self-righteous indignation, “interferes with the profitable and free use of his property by the owner or lessee of a tenement-house who is a cigarmaker.”

    A History of American Law

  • A ponderous federal report was issued in 1894; in 1900, Laurence Veiller, one of the tireless reformers of the late 19th century, held a tenement-house exhibition.

    A History of American Law

  • The law, said the court, in self-righteous indignation, “interferes with the profitable and free use of his property by the owner or lessee of a tenement-house who is a cigarmaker.”

    A History of American Law

  • The law, said the court, in self-righteous indignation, “interferes with the profitable and free use of his property by the owner or lessee of a tenement-house who is a cigarmaker.”

    A History of American Law

  • New York had had a tenement-house law since 1867; it seemed to have little impact.

    A History of American Law

  • A ponderous federal report was issued in 1894; in 1900, Laurence Veiller, one of the tireless reformers of the late 19th century, held a tenement-house exhibition.

    A History of American Law

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