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Etymologies

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Examples

  • From 'sorbetti' to 'gelati', pastries to all styles of coffee drinks, Dolcezza beckons with the intimacy of a modernized Italian shop.

    Examiner California Headlines

  • 'sorbetti' flavors available at Dolcezza; dulce de leche and Thai coconut milk seal the deal in flavor and creaminess as two of the options under the 'gelati' side of the menu.

    Examiner California Headlines

  • Gelati ($7) are creamy and intensely flavored (get the malted milk chocolate and the rice custard), as are the refreshing and light sorbetti ($7) (get all three currently offered: lemon mint, rhubarb, and plum).

    Ed Levine: Tribeca's Newest Mod-Italian, A Restaurant For The Times

  • I read and fleetingly have even noticed that Sketch also serves sorbetti and granite.

    "We freeze it fresh every day."

  • Bar Toma's lunch menu includes three of the restaurant's best features: the charred-carrots appetizer, which is amazing, the softly chewy pizzas get the Smoke and Cure version and the house-made gelati and sorbetti for dessert.

    News - chicagotribune.com

  • In addition to the gelato and sorbetti, Paciugo holds another sugary draw for the sweet-toothed: glass bottles of Dr. Pepper from Dublin, Texas, whose bottling plant is legendary among hard-core soda fans for its use of cane sugar rather than high-fructose corn syrup.

    Chicago Reader

  • There are no-sugar-added and soy varieties, as well as several flavors of sorbetti, among them banana-carrot and blackberry-cabernet.

    Chicago Reader

  • It’s just out of bounds, but Peter Cherches is reporting thatyou can get “8-10 flavors of gelati and sorbetti” from a cart in front of Nino’s Poisitano (on 2nd Ave.btw. 47+48th).

    Gelato From a Cart Now (Kebabs Coming Soon) | Midtown Lunch - Finding Lunch in the Food Wasteland of NYC's Midtown Manhattan

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  • "Since the start of the seventeenth century, Neapolitans, like their Roman ancestors, had been using the eternal snows of Mt Etna to cool their drinks. Now they were influenced by sorbetti, the sherbets of Turkey: fruit syrups that were chilled but (and this is important) never frozen. It became quite the thing in Naples to mound pyramids of snow on to the dessert table and to serve wines chilled in an ice bucket."

    --Kate Colquhoun, Taste: The Story of Britain Through Its Cooking (NY: Bloomsbury, 2007), 178

    January 16, 2017