Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • I never got a call back from the people at the San Francisco Chronicle about the pronunciation of the word spadia, but I found this: "It's a variation on the partial-page ad that wraps around the comics, which is called a spadea pronounced spay-dee-uh."

    languagehat.com: PRONUNCIATION QUIZ.

  • However, this is the same source which says a spadia is the same as a gatefold, which it is not.

    languagehat.com: PRONUNCIATION QUIZ.

  • A spadia is a page wrapped around the spine of a periodical so as to appear as a narrow flap or partial page.

    Flap Wrapper - Anil Dash

  • As for "spadia," I'd never heard of it either, even though I used to work in advertising and (editorially) in newspapers (and ruined more than a few pairs of slacks at the presses).

    languagehat.com: PRONUNCIATION QUIZ.

  • FYI, one source claims that that the spadia appeared first about 15 years ago.

    languagehat.com: PRONUNCIATION QUIZ.

  • I'm wondering if the Greek root of the latter half of that word might also be the origin of our "spadia."

    languagehat.com: PRONUNCIATION QUIZ.

Comments

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  • Sometimes spelled spadea also. I believe the NYT just started using them in 2007.

    July 29, 2008

  • "In this morning’s New York Times, NBC promoted the television shows 'Heroes,' 'Chuck,' 'Bionic Woman,' and 'Journeyman' with the ads, which consisted of a back page that folded over to occupy about a quarter of the front cover. They ran in the Metro, Business Day, SportsMonday and The Arts sections.

    According to a press release from the Times, these ads are called 'spadias' and this was 'the first time all four front/backs have been purchased in one day by the same advertiser.'"

    The New York Times, NBC Wraps Newspapers in Ads, by Jennifer A. Kingson, September 24, 2007

    July 25, 2008