Definitions

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  • n. Plural form of spelding.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I bought some speldings, fish (generally whitings) salted and dried in a particular manner, being dipped in the sea and dried in the sun, and eaten by the Scots by way of a relish.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • † [Note: My friend, General Campbell, Governour of Madras, tells me, that they make speldings in the East Indies, particularly at Bombay, where they call them Bambaloes.]

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • [160] My friend, General Campbell, Governour of Madras, tells me, that they made speldings in the East-Indies, particularly at Bombay, where they call them Bambaloes.

    Life of Johnson

  • Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge, ii. 27, 279; v. 370; speldings, v. 55; spinnet, a, v. 314;

    Life of Johnson

  • Madras, tells me, that they make speldings in the East Indies, particularly at Bombay, where they call them Bambaloes.] his palate; but he was very reluctant.

    The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Comments

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  • (See also spelding.)

    "Cod is the fish of choice for curing, though all of the other gadiforms are cured too, often now as a less costly substitute for cod. Salt ling is a Scottish tradition, and speldings, wind-dried whiting wetted with seawater as they dried to give a special taste, became a local specialty north of Aberdeen in the eighteenth century. At the same time, south of Aberdeen, haddocks were being dried on shore and smoked over peat and seaweed fires by the wives of the fishermen of Findon—which is the origin of the still-celebrated finnan haddie. This has achieved such status that an occasional bogus smoked cod is passed off in the United States as finnan haddie, while a salted haddock might be passed off as salt cod."

    —Mark Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (New York: Penguin, 1997), 41

    July 14, 2009