Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of squizz.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We had our hot assistant take a squiz at what you wrote, *

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  • Nice to have a squiz at your site and your thoughts.

    Australia's Own School of Landscape Painting II

  • My advice would be to hunt it down in a bookstore and take a squiz through it.

    Cheeseburger Gothic » Friday writing column.

  • But fancy letting all those people have a good squiz at your cellulite - eww.

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  • In all the recipes I have had a squiz at, there is no marked ratio of flour to butter that distinguishes them, both can call on rising agents, nuts, and fruit.

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • Unless keenly interested in what you and Ross have to say, I fear that most visitors will have a squiz, find a complex interlayering of argument, rebuttal etc and leave.

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  • However, Good on her to finally get out of the house, learn Engligh and get a job! squiz, how is the woman a "burden on the state" when she's educated herself, is employed and pays taxes?

    Evening Standard - Home

  • Ingmar Bergman lived on Fårö and is now buried in this graveyard, so we got to have a squiz at his grave.

    TravelPod.com TravelStream™ — Recent Entries at TravelPod.com

  • Squiz's Supported Open Source Content Management System, MySource Matrix, is used by many leading organisations including EMAP, the University of Oxford and the Electoral Commission.www. squiz.co.uk

    PR Leap - Recent News Releases

  • In courts fans were called subjects and were always loyal and adoring till they copped a squiz of a guillotine.

    IOL Technology

Comments

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  • Australian and New Zealand slang - a quick look, as in:
    "I won't have time to proofread it, but I'll take a squiz at it now and see if there's anything glaring."

    Shorter OED says it's most likely a blend of quiz and squint. The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English agrees with the Antipodean connection but gives "British dialect (Devon)" as the source.

    March 30, 2008