Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A general name for the principal or standard coin of various cities and states of ancient Greece.
  • noun One who states.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Gr. Antiq.) The principal gold coin of ancient Greece. It varied much in value, the stater best known at Athens being worth about £1 2s., or about $5.35 (in 1890 value). The Attic silver tetradrachm was in later times called stater.
  • noun One who states.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A gold, silver or electrum coin of ancient Greece.
  • noun A citizen of the United States of America who is a confirmed or lifelong resident of one single state.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a resident of a particular state or group of states
  • noun any of the various silver or gold coins of ancient Greece

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek στατήρ (stater).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

to state + -er

Examples

  • Coins larger than the drachma also existed; the largest denomination in each weight system is known as a stater.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • Coins larger than the drachma also existed; the largest denomination in each weight system is known as a stater.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • The stater was a unit of currency; probably in this case the Corinthian stater, almost equal to two Attic drachmas; see Appendix J, Classical Greek Currency, ©4.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • A sicle or shekel of silver, (which was also called a stater,) according to the standard or weight of the sanctuary, which was the most just and exact, was half an ounce of silver, that is, about half a crown of English money.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Complete The Challoner Revision

  • A sicle or shekel of silver, (which was also called a stater,) according to the standard or weight of the sanctuary, which was the most just and exact, was half an ounce of silver, that is, about half a crown of English money.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Complete

  • A sicle or shekel of silver, (which was also called a stater,) according to the standard or weight of the sanctuary, which was the most just and exact, was half an ounce of silver, that is, about half a crown of English money.

    The Bible, Douay-Rheims, Book 02: Exodus The Challoner Revision

  • The stater was a Greek gold coin; its value is usually given at about $5.00, but Grote here makes it considerably less.

    The Two Great Retreats of History

  • They make one with an electric stater, which is not really necessary unless you lack the strength to give the rope a couple quick pulls.

    Epinions Recent Content for Home

  • We are not told what sort of fish it was in whose mouth Peter found the "stater," a piece of money worth about three shillings, which was exactly enough to give, as the Lord told him, to those who had come to ask for money to meet some expenses belonging to the temple.

    Twilight and Dawn Simple Talks on the Six Days of Creation

  • Peter would find in the mouth of the first fish that took his bait, is more correctly designated by the literal translation "stater," [809] indicating a silver coin equivalent to a shekel, or two didrachms, and therefore the exact amount of the tax for two persons.

    Jesus the Christ A Study of the Messiah and His Mission According to Holy Scriptures Both Ancient and Modern

Comments

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  • One for the coin listers.

    February 7, 2013

  • "The Kushans issued a gold coin called a stater (the soldiers of Alexander the Great originally introduced this Greek coin to the Gandhara region in the fourth century BCE), and some bronze stater coins have been found in Khotan, the oasis 150 miles (240 km) west of Niya. In addition, the Khotan kings minted their own bronze coins in imitation of the stater (with Chinese on one face, Kharoshthi on the other), which are called Sino-Kharoshthi coins."

    --Valerie Hansen, The Silk Road: A New History (Oxford and New York: Oxford UP, 2012), 48

    December 30, 2016