Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A resident of a particular state or type of state. Often used in combination: Lone Star staters; farm staters; the struggle between slave staters and free staters.
  • n. Any of various gold, silver, or electrum coins of ancient Greece.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A gold, silver or electrum coin of ancient Greece.
  • n. A citizen of the United States of America who is a confirmed or lifelong resident of one single state.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who states.
  • n. The principal gold coin of ancient Greece. It varied much in value, the stater best known at Athens being worth about £1 2s., or about $5.35 (in 1890 value). The Attic silver tetradrachm was in later times called stater.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who states.
  • n. A general name for the principal or standard coin of various cities and states of ancient Greece.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a resident of a particular state or group of states
  • n. any of the various silver or gold coins of ancient Greece

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Late Latin statēr, from Greek, from histanai, sta-, to set on a scale, weigh; see system.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek στατήρ (stater).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

to state + -er

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "The Kushans issued a gold coin called a stater (the soldiers of Alexander the Great originally introduced this Greek coin to the Gandhara region in the fourth century BCE), and some bronze stater coins have been found in Khotan, the oasis 150 miles (240 km) west of Niya. In addition, the Khotan kings minted their own bronze coins in imitation of the stater (with Chinese on one face, Kharoshthi on the other), which are called Sino-Kharoshthi coins."

    --Valerie Hansen, The Silk Road: A New History (Oxford and New York: Oxford UP, 2012), 48

    December 30, 2016

  • One for the coin listers.

    February 7, 2013