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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Rather than head down the failed path he previously stode of attacking Stefan (an effort to which he was so thoroughly shot down), Paddy Mac now suggests that Cantwell's deliberate interference in another woman's marriage (she slept with Dotzauer the week of his wedding) has significance only if her affair somehow violated FEC laws.

    Sound Politics: Timing is everything

  • I laughed quietly until I could breath again, then I stode over to wash my hands.

    super-suzan Diary Entry

  • And that euery Christian manne, when he stode in any daungier of death, beyng whole of minde, should receiue it as a waifaring viande, to staye him by the waye: with as good preparation of bodye and soule, as he possibly mighte.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Noursse, departed a side into a place called Cloacina, where the shoppes be, nowe called Tabernæ Nouæ, and plucking a sharpe knife from a Bocher that stode by, he thrust the same to the harte of his doughter, sayinge:

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Both the armies stode in readines before their campes, rather voyde of present perill then of care: for the state of either of their Empires, consisted in the valiance and fortune of a fewe.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • The sonne not able to abide the discourse of his parents affaires, could not comprehend any thing at that pitiful meting: but stode stil so astonned, as though he had bin fallen from the clouds.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Cheepe, hanged with rich clothe of golde, velvet, and silke; and along the streets, from the Toure to Powles, stode in order all the craftes of

    Coronation Anecdotes

  • Blynne your contekions [81], chiefs; for, as I stode

    The Rowley Poems

  • But for the most party euery stroke that Accolon gaf he wounded sore Arthur, that it was merucylle he stode.

    A History of English Prose Fiction

  • Thenne were they wroth bothe, and gaf eche other many sore strokes, but alweyes Syr Arthur lost so muche blood that it was merucille he stode on his feet, but he was so ful of knighthode, that knyghtly he endured the payne.

    A History of English Prose Fiction

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