Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. See Stour, a.
  • n. See Stour, n.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as stoor, stoor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And of my stress of parting-stowre on me so heavy weighs

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • War, and brake the power of the children of impiety and pride and stowre.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • What, for example, does the modern Englishman make of this, taken from the “Tale of the Wolf and the Fox,” “Follow not frowardness, for the wise forbid it; and it were most manifest frowardness to leave me in this pit draining the agony of death and dight to look upon mine own doom, whereas it lieth in thy power to deliver me from my stowre?”

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • And for his sake haue felt full many an heauie stowre.

    The Faerie Queene — Volume 01

  • Then gan she waile and weepe, to see that woefull stowre.

    The Faerie Queene — Volume 01

  • Hast thou not heard the words of the poet who spoke these couplets, [FN#149] 'The world aye whirleth with its sweet and sour * And Time aye trippeth with its joy and stowre:

    Arabian nights. English

  • But in the stress and stowre I got sundry grievous wounds and sore; and, since that time, I have passed on his back three days without tasting food or sleeping aught, so that my strength is down brought and the world is become to me as naught.

    Arabian nights. English

  • Stanza XXXII. line 679. stowre, noise and confusion of battle.

    Marmion

  • On likewise did they with the rest of the Wazirs and Olema and Notables, slaying them, one after other, till they made a clean finish. 165 Then the King called the headsmen and bade them ply sword upon all who remained of the folk of velour and stowre; so they fell on them and left none whom they knew for a man of mettle but they slew him, sparing only the proletaires and the refuse of the people.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Know that whoso from ruin saveth a soul, is as if he had quickened it and made it whole; and whoso saveth a soul alive, is as if he had saved all mankind. 154 Follow not frowardness, for the wise forbid it: and it were most manifest frowardness to leave me in this pit draining the agony of death and dight to look upon mine own doom, whenas it lieth in thy power to deliver me from my stowre.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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