Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun Eurasian rose with prickly stems and fragrant leaves and bright pink flowers followed by scarlet hips

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Eglantine is, according to the encyclopedia, a type of wild rose often called sweetbriar, but it is also often been used as a place or character name in English poetry.

    Archive 2007-08-01

  • Eglantine is, according to the encyclopedia, a type of wild rose often called sweetbriar, but it is also often been used as a place or character name in English poetry.

    The WritingYA Weblog: The One Shot World Tour: Best Read With Vegemite!

  • Firesong had grown up around the gray and brown of lightbark and willow, sighing-leaf, loversroot and sweetbriar, but the overcast and mud of Hardorn were different, even if the colors were the same as those Vale plants and trees.

    Widows and Orphans

  • The two boys the whole way came with offerings of wild honeysuckle and sweetbriar, the grateful nosegays of all-diffusing nature, to the coach windows, each carefully presenting the most fragrant to Indiana; for

    Camilla

  • I want to plant antique flowers in beds here, separated by sweetbriar hedges, but I wanted to wait and ask you what you particularly like.

    The Wayward Muse

  • I want to plant antique flowers in beds here, separated by sweetbriar hedges, but I wanted to wait and ask you what you particularly like.

    The Wayward Muse

  • The standards to be roses; juniper; hory; berberries (but here and there, because of the smell of their blossoms); red currants; gooseberries; rosemary; bays; sweetbriar; and such like.

    The Essays

  • I want to plant antique flowers in beds here, separated by sweetbriar hedges, but I wanted to wait and ask you what you particularly like.

    The Wayward Muse

  • I recollect Peggotty and I peeping out at them from my little window; I recollect how closely they seemed to be examining the sweetbriar between them, as they strolled along; and how, from being in a perfectly angelic temper, Peggotty turned cross in a moment, and brushed my hair the wrong way, excessively hard.

    David Copperfield

  • It was a very fine evening, and my mother and he had another stroll by the sweetbriar, while I was sent in to get my tea.

    David Copperfield

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.