Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The ordinal number matching the number ten in a series.
  • noun One of ten equal parts.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Last in order of a series of ten; preceded by nine of the same kind; next in order after that which is ninth: an ordinal numeral.
  • Being one of ten equal portions or sections.
  • noun One of ten equal parts into which anything may be divided; a tithe.
  • noun In early English law, a tithe of the rents of the year, or of movables, or both, granted or levied by way of tax.
  • noun Eccles., the tenth part of the annual profit of every living in England, formerly paid to the Pope, but by statute transferred to the crown, and afterward made a part of the fund called Queen Anne's bounty.
  • noun In music: The interval, whether melodic or harmonic, between any tone and a tone one octave and two degrees distant from it; also, a tone distant by such an interval from a given tone; a compound third.
  • noun An organ-stop giving tones a tenth above the normal pitch of the digitals used; a decima, or double tierce.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The next in order after the ninth; one coming after nine others.
  • noun The quotient of a unit divided by ten; one of ten equal parts into which anything is divided.
  • noun The tenth part of annual produce, income, increase, or the like; a tithe.
  • noun (Mus.) The interval between any tone and the tone represented on the tenth degree of the staff above it, as between one of the scale and three of the octave above; the octave of the third.
  • noun A temporary aid issuing out of personal property, and granted to the king by Parliament; formerly, the real tenth part of all the movables belonging to the subject.
  • noun (Eccl. Law) The tenth part of the annual profit of every living in the kingdom, formerly paid to the pope, but afterward transferred to the crown. It now forms a part of the fund called Queen Anne's Bounty.
  • adjective Next in order after the ninth; coming after nine others.
  • adjective Constituting or being one of ten equal parts into which anything is divided.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective The ordinal form of the number ten.
  • noun The person or thing in the tenth position.
  • noun One of ten equal parts of a whole.
  • noun music The interval between any tone and the tone represented on the tenth degree of the staff above it, as between one of the scale and three of the octave above; the octave of the third.
  • noun UK, law, historical, in the plural A temporary aid issuing out of personal property, and granted to the king by Parliament; formerly, the real tenth part of all the movables belonging to the subject.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective coming next after the ninth and just before the eleventh in position
  • noun a tenth part; one part in ten equal parts
  • noun position ten in a countable series of things

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English tenthe, alteration of tethe, from Old English tēotha; see tithe.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English. Old English had tēoþa (origin of Modern English tithe), but the force of analogy to the cardinal number "ten" caused Middle English speakers to recreate the regular ordinal and re-insert the nasal consonant.

Examples

  • To those of you who spend your afternoons conducting doctoral seminars on the idea of the body in tenth century poetry, my excitement probably seems a little pathetic.

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • While looking for something this evening, I stumbled on a box of old high school documents and had nearly forgotten these haiku I wrote in tenth grade:

    Archive 2009-02-01

  • While looking for something this evening, I stumbled on a box of old high school documents and had nearly forgotten these haiku I wrote in tenth grade:

    Stroll Down Memory Lane

  • I am puzzled by your comment about Congress working only on "proposed" budgets; that may be how it is taught in tenth grade American Government, but that sure doesn't represent how it works in practice - there are numerous examples every year of proposed budgets being altered by Congress (both up and down).

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Bill - and NASA - NASA Watch

  • You know, I had to read that book in tenth grade, but due to the fact we had 30 books from the classics and I am not usually a fan of the Russian literature.

    Mikhail A. Bulgakov - Master and Margarita (Book Review)

  • The funniest is Uwe Bolls, who placed Postal in tenth position below the likes of Raging Bull and Taxi Driver. glucas meh. those are all great films no doubt. it reads like an internet forums greatest list.

    David Fincher’s Favorite Movies of All Time | /Film

  • To those of you who spend your afternoons conducting doctoral seminars on the idea of the body in tenth century poetry, my excitement probably seems a little pathetic.

    I must have nodded off for a moment...

  • Like others have pointed out, to use alternative methods a child must first fail the WASL twice, and then in tenth grade if they use any of the WASL alternatives, they receive an "alternative" diploma called a "Certificate of INDIVIDUAL Achievement" instead of a "Certificate of ACCADEMIC Achievement".

    Sound Politics: "More WASL delays coming?"

  • Their daring and skill remind me of a remark T.E. Lawrence made of strategy in war: "Nine-tenths of tactics are certain, and taught in books: but the irrational tenth is like the kingfisher flashing across the pool, and that is the test of generals."

    It May Sound Funny

  • Their daring and skill remind me of a remark T.E. Lawrence made of strategy in war: "Nine-tenths of tactics are certain, and taught in books: but the irrational tenth is like the kingfisher flashing across the pool, and that is the test of generals."

    It May Sound Funny

Comments

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  • I bet my Virginia cousins would have no problem rhyming tenth with plinth, just as they rhyme pen with tin.

    March 13, 2008