Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Relating to or existing by the union of the divine and human natures, or by the joint agency of the divine and human natures: as, the theandric operation (the harmonious coöperation of the two natures in Christ).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Relating to, or existing by, the union of divine and human operation in Christ, or the joint agency of the divine and human nature.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective theology Relating to, or existing by, the union of divine and human operation in Christ, or the joint agency of the divine and human nature.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ancient Greek

Examples

  • We have seen therefore that to some of our Lord's actions the word theandric cannot be applied at all; to some it can be applied in one sense, to others in a different sense.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • Here the Divine action is distinguished from the human actions of touching or speaking, though it uses them, but through this close connexion the word theandric is not out of place for the whole complex act, while the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • Therefore they are also called theandric, but in a different sense — they are materially theandric, humano-divine.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • There is what Maximus and others called a 'theandric', a divine-human reality going on there, and the icon, the image of Jesus Christ represents that theandric reality - the interweaving (not fusion or confusion) of the endless, divine resourcefulness of agency and love with the particularities of a human life.

    Royal Academy of Arts Byzantium Lecture 'Icons and the Practice of Prayer'

  • Monophysites, and it is now plain that the chief points on which the various sections of Monophysites were agreed against Catholicism were the assertions that there is but one Will in the Incarnate Word, and that the operations (activities, energeiai) of Christ are not to be distinguished into two classes, the Divine and the human, but are to be considered as being the "theandric" (Divino-human) actions of the one Christ (see EUTYCHIANISM).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Monophysites were therefore quite right in saying that all the actions, human and divine, of the incarnate Son are to be referred to one agent, who is the God-man; but they were wrong in inferring that consequently His actions, both the human and the Divine, must all be called "theandric" or "divino-human", and must proceed from a single divino-human energeia.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • There is what Maximus and others called a 'theandric', a divine-human reality going on there, and the icon, the image of Jesus Christ represents that theandric reality - the interweaving (not fusion or confusion) of the endless, divine resourcefulness of agency and love with the particularities of a human life.

    Latest News from Ekklesia

  • Though the Monophysites in general spoke of "one theandric operation", yet a speech of St. Martin at the Lateran Council tells us that a certain Colluthus would not go even so far as this, for he feared lest "theandric" might leave some operation to the human nature; he preferred the word thekoprepes, Deo decibilis (Mansi, X,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • I said that Scripture is a theandric reality, that is, divine-human.

    Archive 2008-03-09

  • The effect that is brought about in such a way is a theandric reality, that is, fully divine and fully human: both elements intimately fused even if not "confused."

    Archive 2008-03-09

Comments

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  • Relating to, or existing by, the union of divine and human operation in Christ, or the joint agency of the divine and human nature.

    July 2, 2009