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Examples

  • True it is, where zeale is, there is opposition, and so consequently troubles: Christ sets this fire on earth, not as an author, but by accident: The theefe is the authour of the fray, though the true man strike never so many blowes: but the

    A Coal From The Altar, To Kindle The Holy Fire of Zeale In a Sermon Preached at a Generall Visitation at Ipswich

  • I did ever thinke, that thou wast the theefe thy selfe, yet thou imputedst thy robbery to some other, for feare we should once drinke freely of thy purse, as thou hast done many times of ours.

    The Decameron

  • And before any person could take notice thereof, hee became (of a theefe) Ruffian, forswearer, and murtherer, as formerly he had-beene a great Preacher; yet not abandoning the forenamed vices, when secretly he could put any of them in execution.

    The Decameron

  • And as he was starting-up, with full intent to acquaint them: a yong man, who had stood there all this while, and observed the hard pleading on either side; he crowded into the Barre, being named Publius Ambustus, a fellow of lewd life, and utterly out of hopes, as being debauched in all his fortunes, and knowne among the Romaines to be a notorious theefe, who verily had committed the murder.

    The Decameron

  • Sir (quoth shee) you have apprehended Ruggiero de Jeroly, as a theefe, and judgement of death is (as I heare) pronounced against him: but hee is wrongfully accused, and is clearly innocent of such

    The Decameron

  • The theefe was hewen in péeces by the kings seruants, but yet he slue and hurt diuers before they could dispatch him.

    Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (6 of 8) The Sixt Booke of the Historie of England

  • There was no priuie theefe nor common robber that durst lay hands vpon other mens goods, but he might looke to make amends with losse of his life, if he were knowne to be giltie.

    Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (6 of 8) The Sixt Booke of the Historie of England

  • The other two brethren perceiving so great a murther, and neglecting their owne lives, like desperate persons dressed themselves against the tyrant, and threw a great number of stones at him, but the bloudy theefe exercised in such and like mischiefes, tooke a speare and thrust it cleane through the body: howbeit he fell not downe to the ground.

    The Golden Asse

  • In the end, I was more hardier and began to devoure the whole messes of the sweet delicates, which caused the Baker and the Cooke to suspect, howbeit they nothing mistrusted me, but searched about to apprehend the theefe.

    The Golden Asse

  • Why doe I not kill this lame theefe and weake wretch.

    The Golden Asse

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