Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A habitual drinker of alcohol, especially wine; a drunkard.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who drinks much wine.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who drinks much wine; a tippler; a drunkard.

Etymologies

wine +‎ bibber (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Nevertheless, when as a young girl she was given the duty of drawing wine for the family, she ignored the maxim and indulged in wine until the day an angry servant caught her drunk and called her a "winebibber."

    Archive 2008-08-24

  • The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • The Son of man is come eating and drinking; and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners!

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • “The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans—”

    What Would Betty Do?

  • He wanted to look like a winebibber, because he pushed the brick from a building where a large number of sots kept their dens.

    The Waste Lands

  • None of this seems to have gone down well with the religious authorities: Jesus remonstrates, "The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man who is a glutton, and a winebibber, a friend of tax-collectors and sinners."

    Who Do Men Say That I Am?

  • It was a matter of infamy for a Jew to keep swine: "R. Jonah had a very red face, which a certain woman seeing said thus, Seignior, Seignior, either you are a winebibber, or a usurer, or a keeper of hogs."

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

  • It lay directly and immediately against the person of Christ, and against his cross; it would not believe that he was the Messiah, but called him "a glutton, a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners."

    The Sermons of John Owen

  • They co'd Him a winebibber, and a friend o 'all maks o' bad uns.

    Lancashire Idylls (1898)

  • He, the purest and holiest of men, provided wine for the wedding feast, introduced the fatted calf and music and dancing into the picture of welcome of the prodigal son to his father's house, and even provoked the sneer of his adversaries that he 'came eating and drinking,' and was a 'glutton' and a 'winebibber.'

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No. 6, December 1864 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

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