Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. one who is third-rate or distinctly inferior

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It's much easier to dimiss a pleasant third-rater like Rhoda Broughton, who in one novel absconds with a passage from The Mill on the Floss without so much as a "please, George."

    Plagiary

  • And there can hardly be a comedy-club third-rater or MoveOn.org activist in the entire country who hasn't stated with sarcastic certainty that the whole WMD fuss was a way of lying the American people into war.

    Saddam's Weapons Plants!

  • Eager to see his mother again and on the chance that there would be no further prosecution of him, he agreed to lay down to Willard who was a third-rater, in spite of his great reluctance to give up the title.

    World’s Great Men of Color

  • Also, if he had been a third-rater, he could have had white women as the lesser Negro fighters had, or as the white fighters had Negro women, and no one would have minded.

    World’s Great Men of Color

  • I understand you perfectly; you're a third-rater, Van, and all your life you've been afraid that someone would see through you, and send you back to the foot of the class.

    The Past Through Tomorrow

  • Quiroga is a third-rater and a stooge-in my opinion, a stooge for villains.

    Double Star

  • In the East Perry Blair had been little known and reckoned a third-rater.

    Winner Take All

  • It is common to see the boss's nephew or his son get a good spot in the office and then rise like a rocket, even though he is a third-rater.

    The Armed Forces Officer Department of the Army Pamphlet 600-2

  • If you've noticed the paintings they buy to hang in their parlors - the wooden waves put on canvas by the local Rembrandts - I may be a third-rater, but I couldn't bring myself to do stuff like that.

    The Black Camel

  • She's a third-rater, except in demagoguery (and in faking sincerity).

    "BANPC" via James Bow in Google Reader

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