Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • pronoun An unspecified or unknown person; someone.
  • noun A person of importance.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Some one; a person unknown, unascertained, or unnamed.
  • noun Pl. somebodies (-iz). A person of consideration, consequence, or importance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A person unknown or uncertain; a person indeterminate; some person.
  • noun A person of consideration or importance.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • pronoun Some unspecified person.
  • noun A recognised person, a celebrity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a human being

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

some +‎ body

Examples

  • It looks to me as if somebody -- _somebody_, I mention no names -- may have had a hint of what was coming and began to lay plans according ....

    Fair Harbor

  • He knows all about it, however -- somebody has told him -- _somebody_ tells everybody everything in our village.

    Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor Volume I

  • If I didn't have you to tell -- have somebody -- "She considered, with brows slightly knitted --" if I didn't have _somebody_ to talk to, it wouldn't be very good for me.

    The Common Law

  • He valued himself on being something, and somebody, independently of his fortune -- he had worked hard to become so -- he had the consciousness about him of tried integrity, resolution, and virtue; and was it to be implied that he was _somebody_, only in consequence of his having chanced to become heir to so many thousands a year?

    Tales and Novels — Volume 09

  • View It » thanks for this interesting article. my only hope is that if somebody committed massive fraud by salting gold with tungsten, then when dealing with that much money, _somebody_ hopefully would have audited the gold. i mean, who would be so foolish to transfer massive quantities of gold without an audit? tungsten weighs close to gold, but would show up on a scale. once the bars are melted down, then the tungsten is visibly seen immediately as it does not bind to gold, so it cannot be circulating in bullion, except from fraudulent singaporian sources that willingly partake in the theft.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • View It » thanks for this interesting article. my only hope is that if somebody committed massive fraud by salting gold with tungsten, then when dealing with that much money, _somebody_ hopefully would have audited the gold. i mean, who would be so foolish to transfer massive quantities of gold without an audit? tungsten weighs close to gold, but would show up on a scale. once the bars are melted down, then the tungsten is visibly seen immediately as it does not bind to gold, so it cannot be circulating in bullion, except from fraudulent singaporian sources that willingly partake in the theft.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • View It » thanks for this interesting article. my only hope is that if somebody committed massive fraud by salting gold with tungsten, then when dealing with that much money, _somebody_ hopefully would have audited the gold. i mean, who would be so foolish to transfer massive quantities of gold without an audit? tungsten weighs close to gold, but would show up on a scale. once the bars are melted down, then the tungsten is visibly seen immediately as it does not bind to gold, so it cannot be circulating in bullion, except from fraudulent singaporian sources that willingly partake in the theft.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • View It » thanks for this interesting article. my only hope is that if somebody committed massive fraud by salting gold with tungsten, then when dealing with that much money, _somebody_ hopefully would have audited the gold. i mean, who would be so foolish to transfer massive quantities of gold without an audit? tungsten weighs close to gold, but would show up on a scale. once the bars are melted down, then the tungsten is visibly seen immediately as it does not bind to gold, so it cannot be circulating in bullion, except from fraudulent singaporian sources that willingly partake in the theft.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • View It » thanks for this interesting article. my only hope is that if somebody committed massive fraud by salting gold with tungsten, then when dealing with that much money, _somebody_ hopefully would have audited the gold. i mean, who would be so foolish to transfer massive quantities of gold without an audit? tungsten weighs close to gold, but would show up on a scale. once the bars are melted down, then the tungsten is visibly seen immediately as it does not bind to gold, so it cannot be circulating in bullion, except from fraudulent singaporian sources that willingly partake in the theft.

    Propeller Most Popular Stories

  • Even the name Sackers is just a label somebody pinned on them.

    The Three-Minute Universe

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