Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who thirsts.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who thirsts.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who or that which thirsts.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a person with a strong desire for something

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

thirst +‎ -er

Examples

  • "What are we doin 'here, anyway?" roared some thirster for information.

    The Clarion

  • That thirster, though he lived aft, was compelled to do the work of a common sailor.

    The Proud Goat of Aloysius Pankburn

  • Having then, in a few well-chosen phrases, discussed one type of camouflage, I would pass on and lead the thirster for information still farther into the by-paths of knowledge.

    No Man's Land

  • What made him so acrimonious does not appear; he was by nature no thirster for blood.

    Lives of the English Poets: Prior, Congreve, Blackmore, Pope

  • This thirster after knowledge would have absorbed willingly any account of Staunton's appearance and manners, his elevated eyebrows and rolling forehead, Munchausen anecdotes, Havannah cigars and tobacco plantations, Buckle's peculiarities, pedantic and sarcastic Johnsonian's gold-headed walking stick, so often lost yet always found, but once, and the frequent affinity between his hat and the spittoon, the yet greater absence of mind of

    Chess History and Reminiscences

  • His countenance was the fiery laugh of a thirster for strife.

    The Tragic Comedians — Volume 2

  • "Ah-ha!" muttered he to himself, "here comes the insolent thirster for blood, grudging us seemingly even the meagre comfort of the path which his horse's hoofs are breaking up; yet, thank Heaven," added the republican, looking with

    The Disowned — Complete

  • "Ah-ha!" muttered he to himself, "here comes the insolent thirster for blood, grudging us seemingly even the meagre comfort of the path which his horse's hoofs are breaking up; yet, thank Heaven," added the republican, looking with a stern satisfaction at the narrowness of the footing, "he cannot very well pass me, and the free lion does not move out of his way for such pampered kine as those to which this creature belongs."

    The Disowned — Volume 07

  • What made him so acrimonious does not appear: he was by nature no thirster for blood.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II

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